Dadoing hand plane?

When I am able to start my learning process of woodwork I will be starting with box making, following a book. ...Don't know which book it will be but definetly a book. I have bought "Box making basics" by David M. Freeman but apparently it is for those that are knowledgeable and can easily follow it and "pick-it-up" using all power tools, no hand joinery involved. In my case I will be using hand tools, and I need to plane grooves, slots, routes, dados? I need to know which (non combination type) type of plane I should buy, that will route a slot that is in from the edge of a small board... any ideas?
Thanks anyone who can help,
Alex
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AArDvarK wrote:

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0.htm http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan5.htm http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan10.htm http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan11.htm http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan14.htm
I highly recommend that you read through the website. It's amusing, informative and educational. Just say, TmPL, read it.
Dave in Fairfax
--
Dave Leader
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<snippage>
And, for a West Coast guy, not retired yet, purchasing a handplane from Patrick has been a safe, reliable means of getting good, old iron.
He doesn't give stuff away, but his prices are fair, and his terms of business are remarkable, in this day and age. I've purchased 4 old Stanleys from him, (#3,#4,#6 and a fillister) and would do so again.
Patriarch
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Yeah I just emailed him a few days ago for his prices for #112 scrapers, no reply yet. I do want a scraper plane. Thanks for the insight though, about the quality of his business.
Alex
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AArDvarK wrote:

Do you get his monthly emailed tool list? http://www.supertool.com/oldtools.htm Not that there any scraper planes this month, but it's nice to look forward to the first of the month. Joe waiting for the #78
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No but now I'll do that, email list. There are several of the 78's on ebay with and without attachments, about two are new ones. And if you get a nice parcial one, all of the parts are still available from the stanley company. And thanks for the tip.
Alex
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AArDvarK wrote:

You're welcome. That's what the wreck is about. Joe still waiting. Why isn't USPS faster, it's been almost a day now:-)
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Box making is an excellent place to start the learning process. Accuracy in every step is revealed in the finish product, because it is examined so closely by almost every observer. Mistakes don't consume 25 bd ft of expensive hardwoods. You can use pieces others consider scrap.
I recommend to you two books from the same series, "The Complete Illustrated Guide to:"
Doug Stowe's "Box Making", http://www.taunton.com/store/pages/070721.asp
and
Gary Rogowski's "Joinery", http://www.taunton.com/store/pages/070535.asp
Excellent, well-illustrated, and pretty complete. Look for them as trade paperbacks, and save a few bucks, if you want. Both cover hand tool and machine methods.
That said, the best tool for making accurate dados, grooves, and rabbets in materials for boxes is almost certainly a good, small, electric powered router.
Enjoy the process.
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For grooves, I can't think of anything better than the Record #044 (cute little metal plough plane, Paddy). It may not be as fast as a routah, but it's a heckuva lot more fun, IMHO.
One time when I was using mine, SWMBO'ette #2 came out into the shop to see what I was up to and she immediately asked if I could collect some of the cool little "curlies" to give to her when I was done.
I don't imagine she would have done that had I been using a routah. :-)

And that's exactly why I like the #044 so much. I can't say I ever enjoy the process when I'm using a tool that's got a sharp carbide bit in it spinning at 21,000 r.p.m. at just about the level of the fambly jewels (tm, somebody). :-}
Chuck Vance
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Dadoing 101 --->>> http://www.klownhammer.org/dado
The Stanley #78, a moving fillester and rabbet plane is not really suited for dadoes, owing to it not possessing a skewed iron... which is pretty much necessary for cutting across grain. Dadoes are also easily accomplished by hand, when done with a back saw, chisel (and optionally a router plane for that final, finished, spiffy look).
A #78 is quite handy for rabbets. I highly recommend using a weightlifter's or bicyclist's glove for your left hand because the metal isn't all that skin-friendly. DAMHIKT.
Humbly submitted, O'Deen
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