Cutting Triangles on Table Saw

I want to make a number of hexagonal pyramids and to do need to cut triangular (isosolese) shapes from plywood, with mitred edges, approximately 12" high with a base of about 6".
Can anyone come up with, or know of, a design for a suitable tablesaw jig.
Gary
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-- Regards, Doug Miller
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A sled with some additional parts and pieces to hold the piece(s) in proper relationship to the blade.
UA100
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wrote:

Make an insert for your sled.
You have made a sled, right? No? This a great time to make one! <G>
Using the sled, you'd cut a rectangle using the first two dimensions of the triangle. Next, using two strips of scrap, screw a "V" inside the sled, with the strips running all the way past the blade kerf.
Think sideways 90 degree miter sled. Here's an example I found in google: <http://www.newwoodworker.com/mitrsldpln.html See the 45 degree fences? Rotate them 90 degrees and use the INSIDE set to the proper angles to make your triangle.
Set the angles properly using architect's triangles. A hold down clamp would be optional. Now use the sled to cut the hypotenuse.
Removing the screws reverts the sled back to plain crosscutting.
Even if you need to build your first crosscut sled and buy the triangle, you could do the whole deal for less than $25, and an hour's work.
Barry
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