cutting down / cutting up trees

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when is the best time to do this
a) for cutting trees down b) for cutting the logs into pieces small enough for an open fire
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Konstabel Els wrote:

Assuming you want the wood for fireplace or stove, two years before you need to burn them.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

My father used to say any time the knife was sharp. ie. saw, ax, etc.
I personally like to cut them when it is not so hot and humid. Meaning early spring or late fall, depending on where you live
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I live in the middle of the Canadian prairies. What is this "hot" and "humid" that you speak of?
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Doug Brown wrote:

Think back to last Summer, which I believe is August 14 in your part of the prairie. It was about 95dF and 95% relative humidity. That was the"hot" and "humid" that some of these southern US types speak of? As I recall, a front came through the next day and it snowed. Oh well...     mahalo, eh?     jo4hn
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jo4hn wrote:

Fortunately, for those of us on the prairie there aren't any trees to have to be bothered about cutting and splitting whatever this thing called "firewood" is... :)
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On Thu, 2 Jul 2009 22:02:04 -0600, "Doug Brown"

It's what we southerners get for free and you northerners pay for. It's called a sauna.
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wrote:

More generally, it's called "free heat".
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krw wrote:

Hey! I represent that...
...northerners can have "free heat" if/when they want it. :)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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wrote:

I was a northerner all my life (IL, NY, VT, OH), then decided to get the "free heat" last year. We moved to Alabama. ;-)
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krw wrote:

After being raised in South Dakota (the only windbreak between us and the north pole was one tree in Minot ND), the family moved to Californee. I took an oath never to touch snow again. Then after more years than I can think about, I retired and moved into the nearby mountains. Twelve feet of snow last winter. [dope slap]
There are a few problems with living in Paradise.
    mahalo,     jo4hn
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wrote:

Indeed. We had about 5" of snow here in Eastern Alabama last winter. SWMBO (said she) wasn't happy about it. It was a perfect snowfall though. Snow only stuck to green things.

Well, sometimes there is too much "free heat" here. It's been a while since I've been able to play with my toys.
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C'mon Jo4hn, there are at least three or four more trees in Saskatchewan - I know 'cause I've seen 'em myself!
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Lots of trees north of Saskatchewan in the NWT. They're pretty small, but they are trees.
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Yeah, but with free heat you don't get all that wonderful moisture. I think you call it "humidity".
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wrote:

When I lived in VT, we didn't get any of that free moisture to go with the *expensive* heat, either. Everything wood (back on-topic ;) fell apart, along with my skin.
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what about splitting the logs, should I leave it 2 years or split them straight away ?
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Konstabel Els wrote:

Around here, where there are cottage industries for firewood, wood is cut down in mid to late winter, snow is on the ground, but temps are a bit reasonable.
The people I know who are in the business split as soon as they've cut to length. So from the time the tree is standing til it's split and piled could be a matter of days, or even the same day if they're really hauling.
Although two years seems to be conventional knowledge for letting wood air after it's been stacked, I've had success with same year wood. ie, the wood is cut and split in March and it's in my woodstove in November. I also have some two and three year old wood. While it does burn a bit better, it's not something I notice that much.
YMMV
Tanus
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I guess it depends on the wood type, soft woods being ready sooner. What I am trying to understand is, as I'm splitting manually, will I use more energy to split the wood when wet, or should I wait for the wood to dry out a bit, since the wood will start splitting itself after a couple of months.
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Konstabel Els wrote: <snip>

It's easier to split if it's dried out a bit - you're right. If you live in northern climates, it's even easier if you wait til a good freeze.
Tanus
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