Cutting down a solid-core door

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My saw has a variable mootness adjustment.
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On Thu, 29 Sep 2011 05:58:10 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

AND a built-in guide.
LJ--I'm gettin' itchier.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air… -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 9/29/11 7:58 AM, Robatoy wrote:

"Like"
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Why not plane it down - with an electric plane.
Martin
On 9/28/2011 3:09 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

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On Thu, 29 Sep 2011 20:40:25 -0500, Martin Eastburn

I picked up one of the little HF electric planers and they're wonderful to use. I use mine to taper plywood for ramps and such. It's a real timesaver. Some day, I'll remember to take the shop vac and hook it up so it's not so bloody messy.
BUT, sawing a door with a circ saw is the best method I've ever used.
-- Win first, Fight later.
--martial principle of the Samurai
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"Martin Eastburn" wrote:

What?
And use the tool designed to do the job!
Surely you jest.
Lew
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On 9/29/11 11:21 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

That can take quite a while and make a heck of a lot of sawdust if you need to remove an inch or more.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 12:51:21 -0700 (PDT), Father Haskell

Agreed!
Um, one shouldn't have their fingers anywhere -near- the saw blade while it is cutting, Dad. Besides, your suggestion there just put someone at risk of a multiple severing of fingers. Smooth!
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air… -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 12:51:21 -0700 (PDT), Father Haskell

wood - meaning the least wasted power.
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On Sep 28, 7:40 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Right. Only reason a table saw blade is set to cut low is to limit how deep a dado it can cut through your hand.
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On 9/28/11 8:22 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Well... there's always the fact that you might not want to cut all the way through your saw horses or have to set your plywood up on the edges of 2x4's to keep from cutting though your workbench or concrete floor.
In any case, I still contend it's a moot point. If you're blade is running too hot or your saw is bogging down, it's time for a new saw and/or blade.
--

-MIKE-

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On 9/28/2011 2:51 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

but you might cut the saw horse in two....
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2011 22:18:11 -0500, Steve Barker

Or your work mutt. (Hi, O'Deen!)
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air… -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On 9/28/2011 3:51 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

I seem to remember being taught to have the blade protrude only a half-inch or so. It might have been shop class, or maybe my Dad, but either way it would have been in the Seventies. I don't specifically remember it being a safety tip.
It seems undeniable that the blade would contact less of the work if it is used at full depth, especially with a thick piece of wood, and thus present less of a strain to the motor. But are there any consequences for the cut itself? It seems to me that the teeth would cut through the top surface of the wood nearly vertically. Would that not tend to chip it more than if the angle had been smaller?
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On 9/29/11 2:12 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Seems to me I would want as many teeth as possible in contact with the cutting area to get the smoothest cut. But that's just me. I mean, I don't mind my saw blade getting all red hot and my saw bogging down and melting the brushes.
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"Greg Guarino" wrote in message
On 9/28/2011 3:51 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

I seem to remember being taught to have the blade protrude only a half-inch or so. It might have been shop class, or maybe my Dad, but either way it would have been in the Seventies. I don't specifically remember it being a safety tip.
It seems undeniable that the blade would contact less of the work if it is used at full depth, especially with a thick piece of wood, and thus present less of a strain to the motor. But are there any consequences for the cut itself? It seems to me that the teeth would cut through the top surface of the wood nearly vertically. Would that not tend to chip it more than if the angle had been smaller? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ It will chip out more but the chip out will be on the bottom. The overall finish will be worse though. Now, can we have a three day thread on how to sharpen a pointy stick?
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On 9/29/2011 3:24 PM, CW wrote:

I'll stick with the shallower cut then.

Ignorance is the default state for human beings as regards most topics. Overcoming it frequently involves asking, politely. I have expended quite a lot of verbiage answering questions from fledgling musicians over the years, often on what seemed like "pointy-stick" level questions to me. But I was a beginner once also, and would have appreciated some good advice. Thanks for yours.
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wrote:

CW needs a new blade with more than 3 teeth left on it. Don't listen to him. ;)
A layer of masking tape on both sides will keep chipping to a minimum. Peel the freshly-cut-in-half tape off -toward- the cut to keep from pulling chips up. Now seal that bottom WELL so it can't absorb water!
-- Win first, Fight later.
--martial principle of the Samurai
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I was taught that the entire tooth should stick out so the gullets can clear. Any more just caused increased chipping and more dust to fly.

Yes. More chipping. TANSTAAFL.
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On 9/29/2011 5:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

(Am I The Only One Who Doesn't Understand These Acronyms?)
Yes, I looked it up, but geez, I'm becoming a neanderthal, I guess.
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