Cutting board question

Last January, we had a storm during which the top third of my Evergreen Magnolia tree landed, in various pieces, on the ground. I saved some of the larger branches (sans leaves) for some sort of craft project. Recently, after a 20-year break, I got my table saw operating again. Out of curiosity, I cut back a piece of one of the branches and got quite excited at making a "stick." The wood is quite attractive and obviously a hardwood.
This house was built mid-forties and has the old-time bread board/cutting board built into the kitchen cabinet. It is not meant for cutting, appears to be made of fir. I would like to make a replacement board out of some of the magnolia pieces. While I don't have a bandsaw or a planer, there are friends who do and could prep the wood for me. Before I make an assumption here (assumptions are always dangerous!), and build the board for lengthwise grain, it seemed smart to verify it with those who know about such things.
Comments, please, on the potential project.
Also, I recently purchased a dovetail jig and will soon be embarking on making drawers/boxes with dovetails. There is no question in my mind that there'll be a dovetail building frenzy follow! Fortunately, I have two granddaughters who, though only little ones (just 4 yesterday and 6 in January) will enjoy treasure boxes.
Another question: Home Depot currently has a scroll saw on sale for $87. Would it be of any worth to buy it or should I wait a bit longer and get a better quality model? At this time, it wouldn't be used for anything serious, but more playing around as my serious stuff will be with the table saw.
Glenna
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I bought a cheap Ryobi scroll saw, and while it did move the blade up and down, it hasn't been a good saw. The adjustments are too sloppy, and the blades don't stay in the holders. If you are going to spend money, spend a bit more and get the Craftsman at $140 or so, they were very highly rated a year or so ago in side by side testing. (My poor Ryobi was the lowest rated of the lot)
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Olson PGT, Precision Ground Teeth, blades are the only way to go in my opinion. Teeth at bottom of the blade aim upward making a smooth cut on the bottom of the slab, even ply,

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snipped-for-privacy@mchsi.com writes:

it is proabably fact that I knew already or the saw would have been in my garage several weeks ago (it's been "on sale" for nearly a month). I'm not one to buy cheap tools, feeling, instead, the extra bucks are paid back multi-fold through years of use. It is unlikely that the scroll saw would get much, if any, use in the next few weeks as my extra time will be devoted to the dovetail jig and trying to coordinate my lack of experience with the jig and router to make some usable experience and, therefore, some drawers and boxes. The appearance of dovetail joints is very appealing to me; of course, the extra strength is nice as well.
Thank you for the comments. Little is more discouraging than to try something new and get bad results because of inadequate tools, be it sawing, sewing, painting, cooking, or gardening. I'll just wait a bit longer and get a better quality scroll saw at WoodCrafters where I can also get some support.
Glenna
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If you look back through messages in the group you will find that the Bosch saws are the favorite! I bought one on their advice and have found it to be excellent. I gave my Craftsman away.
Len -----------
Glenna Rose wrote:

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