Cross Grain Glueing on Small Boxes

Page 2 of 2  


Hardly for beginners, but for the time being there happens to be a drawing that includes a panelled lid for a jewellery box at:
http://www.amgron.clara.net/gwonly/index.htm
You'll need to download a pdf file, viz:
Drawings for Delving Into Detail, Issue 163
Jeff G
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MORE INFORMATION:
The top in question is 6.75 x 11.75. The wood 1/2" is quarter sawn cherry.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would say that for a box 2 inches wide, I wouldn't worry much about wood movenent. Above 4 inches I would. I find it easier to make floating panels than gluing up a solid flat piece with 4 sides glued onto it. Make your 4 sides perfect, and then make the floating panel. It doesn't have to be a perfect fit. robo hippy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom H wrote:

Tom -- the best advice you have been given is a floating panel...
See: 2nd and third boxes http://woodwork.pmccl.com/Business/productsbusiness/productcatalogbusiness/productpagebusiness/modernstyle.html
And this one... http://woodwork.pmccl.com/Business/productsbusiness/productcatalogbusiness/productpagebusiness/classicalstyle.html
Look at the views and you will see what people mean by a floating panel...
Get the book I mentioned earlier and it will explain a "floating panel" It will save you a lot of time -- but even a bad book on jewel box making should have a few pictures and diagrams to make the concept clear...
Groove in the inside frame edges... Tongue on the edges of the lid -- NO GLUE on the tongue or the groove...
Make the bottom the same way. Cut a 1/8" to a 1/4" groove in the bottom of the four box sides -- insert the bottom panel during gluing.
The inserted panel should float (slop around a tich -- not a tad -- that's too much) -- or have a spot of glue at the middle point of the long grain direction to direct wood movement to the edges...
All explained with diagrams in a good book -- better than most sex ed books anyway.
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom H wrote:

Given that information, I think I'd probably take the chance and just glue it on, assuming you simply don't want the look of a floating panel. Consider taking your box pieces parts into the house for several days (longer if you have time) before glue-up. Keep it in the house except when you take it out to the shop to work on it. That should get them pre-shrunk to somewhere close to their ultimate dimensions, and hopefully prevent any future problems.
DonkeyHody "Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for all the good advice. I take in all into consideration as I put pencil to paper. Tom H

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom H wrote:

Well, I'm going to go against the common convention here and say glue it up. You're only going to be gluing across the width, 9" or so. In fact, I've done so with many small boxes without 1 failure:
http://www.areddy.net/wood/jewelry%20box/index.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry, Great pictures. Where do you buy your hardware? I got sticker shock at Rockler.
Tom

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom H wrote:

I really can't recall where I got that hardware... might have been Lee Valley.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.