Countertop laminate success

I tried something I had never done before: relaminating my kitchen countertop with formica right over the old stuff.
The edge trim was oak that had a chamfered edge. This proved to be challenging but not a dealbreaker(the female of the species has officially approved of the results).
It turned out really good. The job was done without taking off the old countertop(lazy I know but it was site built (and looked like I would have to destroy it to get it up).
Now if I can find a cleaner to clean off the small spots of contact cement that accidentally got on the counter surface we'll be in business. Our local big box store did not have the factory approved cleaner so I am temporarily at a stop.
RonT
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Ron, I was thinking of doing the same thing, but figured it would be a bear. How did you do the backsplash? I assume you glued the oak edge on after finishing it?
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The backsplash has yet to be done since we are going to replace the tile on it. We have the tile but lack the time until next weekend.
The existng trim on the countertop was 1x2 oak that had the top edge, along with the laminate edge, chamfered with a router. I just used my router to run over the new laminate and it worked fine except for the dead ends into a wall. There I gingerly used a belt sander. It would be easy to screw up the belt sander part if you are not careful.
The nice part is, the kitchen looks amazingly better for not much money and no tear out or trashing of the old countertop.
The Formica company web site has all the basic instructions.
RonT
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Power tools are _not_ needed for this. A moderately fine-toothed flat file does wonders. I've chamfered many _feet_ of counter edges that way, With a little care, it comes out looking 'just like a pro did it'.
Yes, you can still screw things up, using the manual method. But you -do- have to work harder at it, and it is slow enough that you are likely to discover the problem, while it is still 'trivially' recoverable.
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To remove the dried contact cement I usually just rub it off with my fingers. It comes off like rubber cement. Gene

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laquer thinner will remove it easily. --dave

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Laquer thinner is more apt to sneak in between the laminate and its substrate. Don't use more than a damp (with thinners) rag to rub the adhesive away..ie.. don't pour it on. DAMHIKT
Rob
PS. There are commercial contact cement cleaners on the market, but I have never seen them in small containers.
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It's a good idea to ruff up the old surface, 50 grit and a belt sander did it for me. 6 years ago. Now I'm totally redoing the kitchen, nothing old will be left. I hope SHE is gonna be happy.
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I use Dap brand contact cement cleaner. It's stinky but it works good. SH
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