Could you whack an inch off?

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RE: Subject
Due to present workload, the following schedule applies:
Delivery: 1 year, $10K, paid in advance 5 years, $5K, paid in advance 10 years, $1K, paid in advance
Just a thought.
Lew
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On 10/1/2012 6:49 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

...
You doing art or trying to make a living from woodworking here?
--
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On Monday, October 1, 2012 9:58:32 PM UTC-7, dpb wrote:

Today I do it for love. I love building this stuff. I do it as a side-job/hobby. If I can sell what I make it helps buy more wood and tools. I do sell most of what o build pretty quickly.
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On 10/2/2012 2:32 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

If it's for the personal satisfaction only you can tell 'em it's what it is (not that you _can't_ otherwise; it's just a _very_ difficult business model).
If one is in an actual business it's sometimes a hard lesson to swallow. Years and years ago I moved from doing custom work of that sort also as a sideline but w/ intention as young pup just out of school to make some extra cash to the architectural stuff I've spoken of before in Lynchburg, VA in large part because it was more fun to be able to restore/repair/replace the excellent work found in those old houses than it was to build the stuff that would sell (that was in my skill set of the time, at least :) ).
As a popular bumper sticker here in SW KS farm country says, "Farming without a profit motive is gardening". The sentiment has to hold for any vocation--vision is nice but it may not pay the bills.
--
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On 10/3/2012 10:27 AM, dpb wrote:

I figured about 2 people here earn their living from their wood shop. One of them, and I felt sorry for him, was SonomaProducts. Now I find out he earns his living otherwise, and does this stuff more as a hobby. So I was off by about one, possibly two, and, since it's his hobby, I don't have to feel sorry for him. In other words, about no one here is a farmer, most are "just gardeners".
I've found over the years to only make what you want, not much else unless it is for a very, very good friend, then do it for friendship, not money. Few on earth can afford to pay me what I want to make something I *want* to make, let alone something I *don't* want to make, and also be dumb enough to pay that much. Those prices require artistic perfection, something few attain.
How much is it worth to turn a hobby into work?
--
Jack
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measuring from eBay photos and Stickley catlogs. I did a run of very small round tables, in Cherry (not classic). Something you might use as a plant stand. I exercise exacting detail. I did an oil finish (tried and true) that took a few weeks to complete. I give one to a dear friend for his birthday.

a friend. Do you have another one? Could you whack an inch off of the legs and add some adjusters to the bottom in-case they have an uneven floor?"

Keep in mind that the whole Arts & Crafts (Stickley) thing was supposed to be about simple functionality. A stool is meant to be used, not admired in an art gallery.
Whack off a leg instead of an inch. Three legs will be stable on that uneven floor.
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On Tuesday, October 2, 2012 8:59:23 AM UTC-7, Larry Kraus wrote:
I agree that utility is a key component of the style. The things I make are beautiful and useful. However, this particular piece would fall apart if they used it in the shower for very long. Oil finish would not stop water problems that would eventually kill it. I did use pinned tenons so it would hang on for a while but would give up the ghost eventually. Also, people pay for some of my stuff like art when I have something beautiful enough to charge like that.
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When I had a broken lef I bought one of these (sorry if it wraps)
<(Amazon.com product link shortened)- White/dp/B000VYK87U/ref=pd_sim_hpc_8>
--
Best regards
Han
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I just added up the number of "whack an inch off" items in this thread.... If you cut off the cumulative number of inches from the table/stool the seat will be on the floor thus saving you the time and trouble of making legs and stretchers... ;~)
I spend hours getting my Stickley reproduction designs as exact as possible, measuring from eBay photos and Stickley catlogs. I did a run of very small round tables, in Cherry (not classic). Something you might use as a plant stand. I exercise exacting detail. I did an oil finish (tried and true) that took a few weeks to complete. I give one to a dear friend for his birthday.
His wife says "Hey great, we can use it as a stool in the shower!" I help them understand maybe it won't hold up to the use in a wet environment.
Now a few weeks later I get an email. "Hey I want to give one of your stools to a friend. Do you have another one? Could you whack an inch off of the legs and add some adjusters to the bottom in-case they have an uneven floor?"
Maybe I can get him something from Ikea. He won't know the difference. :-(
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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

measuring from eBay photos and Stickley catlogs. I did a run of very small round tables, in Cherry (not classic). Something you might use as a plant stand. I exercise exacting detail. I did an oil finish (tried and true) that took a few weeks to complete. I give one to a dear friend for his birthday.

to a friend. Do you have another one? Could you whack an inch off of the legs and add some adjusters to the bottom in-case they have an uneven floor?"

I had forgotten you were genuinely in the business. I saw this at your web site, associated with some of your kits:
"You are given the unfinished components with all of the complex milling already completed, clear and extensive plans and step-by-step instructions and all the necessary hardware. We also provide numerous fool-proof finishing techniques and recipes that anyone can perform in their home shop, garage or shed."
Maybe the friend you gifted your table to read that? I can understand a little better how he might have been confused by your ambiguous attitude now. Personally, FWIW, I have a lot of respect for your work!
Cheers, Bill
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On Monday, October 1, 2012 6:49:14 PM UTC-5, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

I have built several heavy rocking horses using contrasting hardwoods. I spend 80-100 hours on each and I have seen some with similar substance and features in the $500 and up price range. Two of mine have gone to grandkids and one to the daughter of a good friend. The other two have been donated to our church for raffles.
Invariably someone sees one of them and asks the dreaded question: "How much would it cost for you to build one of those for me? I start off explaining that there is nearly $200 worth of hardwood and hardware in the horse. That is when I get that "over the top of the glasses look" and you can hear them thinking "This guy is getting ready to screw me." These people have no clue that with the cost of materials, even if I charged $500, I could make the big bucks shoving hamburgers across the counter at McDonald's.
They don't have a clue.
RonB
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RonB wrote:

Maybe just say you can make the horses for $750, or that you can provide detailed instructions including a material list for $25. Include a list of the required tools too. To be nice, you can even offer to provide assistance over the phone if they run into trouble.
Maybe if you tried eagerly to explain how they could build their own you could close your sales faster! Perhaps don't even provide them a price until they well understand exactly how they could build their own! : )
Good luck (and have fun)! Bill
These people have no clue that with the cost of

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"RonB" wrote:

Invariably someone sees one of them and asks the dreaded question: "How much would it cost for you to build one of those for me? -------------------------------------------------- Normally the price is $1,000.00; however, if you are not in a hurry, could probably do one for $750 in about 6 months after receipt of a $500.00 advance deposit.
Keeps out the riff raff.
Lew
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On Thursday, October 4, 2012 8:01:13 PM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Mine are not quite in that range. The carousel-type of carved horses do sell in the $1,500 and up (way up) range. Mine is a whimsical take-off of about three different patterns I picked up over the years plus about 1/3 my own design. I have a 16" x 44" x 2-1/2" slab of walnut in the garage now and I'm pretty sure it contains a horse body. Maple on the top row of my rack will make the rockers. Smaller chunks of cherry and Myrtle wood will do mane, tail and details. Just need to it get going.
RonB
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On Friday, October 5, 2012 11:10:49 AM UTC-5, RonB wrote:

A couple of them are here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/27816715@N03 /
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"RonB" wrote:
A couple of them are here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/27816715@N03 /
-------------------------------------------- I wish to revise my comment.
Discounted selling price: $1,000.00.
Base selling price: $1,500.00.
Anything less and your selling yourself short.
Lew
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RonB wrote:

They are beautiful! : )
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+1. Wow, the figure in that walnut mane on #5 is just breathtaking.
-- Doctors prescribe medicine of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, in human beings of which they know nothing. --Francois-Marie Arouet Voltaire, about 250 years ago
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On Friday, October 5, 2012 9:16:12 PM UTC-5, Larry Jaques wrote:

Thanks for the nice comments folks - appreciated. You guys probably wouldn't want to know what I pay for my figured and curly walnut. there is a hardwood mill about 35 miles south of us that provides air-dried wood for local cabinetmakers. But a large part of their market is supplying area high school wood programs. I bought the last small pile of their sapwood/curly 'cast-offs' for .75 to $1.10 per board foot. I have to pick through the pile and about 1/2 or more of a board ends up in the kindling bin but there is some beautiful stuff in there.
Since the next horse will be walnut I am going to try to contrast mane and tail with some Myrtle wood I got in Oregon a couple of weeks ago. Saddle - Maybe Cherry.
RonB
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"RonB" wrote in message
============================================================================================================Fantastic work.
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