Corrosion blocking on tools

I want to stop corrosion problems on my tools without the use of an oil based product. I am in th United Kingdom and seem to remember a small tin with a magnet on the back which when the tin was opened would inhibit corrosion within a certain area of the tin for about 6months to a year. Does anyone out there know where in the UK I can purchase this item I am aware of the Bull Frog range overseas but not in this country. Thanks Bob Robertson
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On Sun, 06 May 2007 08:43:13 GMT, "Bob Robertson"

Lee Valley sells tins of Silica Gel.
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B A R R Y wrote:

Not sure but he may have been referring to the old machinist's trick of leaving camphor blocks (with pin pricks through the wrapper) in their tool chests. Vapors preventing rusting. Worked quite well. Only problem is that it's getting damn hard to find camphor blocks any more.
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A Google search showed a number of sources.
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CW, Your method would also discourage moths from eating your chisels, Joe G
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I can attest to that... never had moths in my tool chest. My father was a tool and die maker back in the 50s and 60s. When he changed roles in the company he brought his tool box home and camphor came with it. The camphor was replaced as needed over the years. I figured if it worked for him it would work for me...
John
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If I ever run across a moth that can eat a chisel, I'm calling the Men in Black.
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Camphor....*barfs*
I absolutely farking hate the smell of that farking stuff....blech to the n-th degree...disgusting.
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Iron Butterfly.
wrote:

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I've got K, J, and Zed on speed dial... <G>
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Bob Robertson wrote:

I am not aware of the Bull Frog range. Camphor used to be used for this purpose, in an enclosed space such as a tool chest. Also Silica gel is used. It sucks up the moisture from the air so could be used in an enclosed space. A hobby shop catering to dried flower enthusiasts should have it.
For large tools or those hanging on the wall, anything that keeps moisture and oxygen from the surface would help. That includes paint, lacquer, camellia oil and plain oil. Gold plating helps, but wears off quickly in tools that are used.
--
Gerald Ross
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Camphor is used to keep moths away from woollen materials. Moth larvae need to eat. Not sure how good woollen tools would be.

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Best regards
Han
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wrote:

I have heard of ww's who place their tools in hermedically sealed chests and put in sticks of chalk (the mineral calcite, a form of limestone) (White Cliffs of Dover) as a desicant. You can also dust your hands with rosin (baseball pitchers rub up their hands with it) This will keep hand moisture from the tools. This advice is free to the user and is guaranteed or your money back. Joe G
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Sun, May 6, 2007, 8:43am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com (BobRobertson) doth query: I want to stop corrosion problems on my tools without the use of an oil based product. <snip>
OK, what do you mean by no oil-based product? No mineral oil? No vegetable oil? Any oil period? What? And why?
And, by corrosion, you mean rust? Or what? There are spray, or brush-on, products that stop rust by converting it to something (iron oxide?). I'm not sure if they contain any oil of any type or not, think not, but then I don't care.
JOAT What is life without challenge and a constant stream of new humiliations? - Peter Egan
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On Sun, 06 May 2007 08:43:13 GMT, "Bob Robertson"

The cheapest way is to wipe your tools with a rag mositened with kerosene which will remove light rust as well. I know you don't want to do this, but it is fast and easy. Your other choice is to put all your tools in cabinets or air-tight containers with a dessicant. Several pieces of caulk will work.
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do a Google search for volatile corrosion inhibitors. There are many companies that supply paper impregnated with volatile amines which are corrosion inhibitors for ferrous metals. You have probably bought some polished tools that came wrapped in this type of paper. Also available are stick on tabs which contain impregnated blotter paper. One problem with this approach is that it only works in enclosed spaces, IE. a drawer or inside a closed cabinet.
Our company supplies the Akzo product for out of service pipelines and storage tanks. It works for these applications. I brought home some of this and put a chemical soaked rag in my tool chest. I am not very good at tightly closing all drawers and doors before going to bed and so on the humid Gulf Coast I would not rate my test as a great success. If you are more fastidious than I, it might work for you.
Paul Gilbert

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Not quite your request but Record in teh UK do a dry spray for use on their cast iron saw tables - its a silicone spray but is completely dry after application - not used this but spoken to oien of their demonstrators about it.
RS Components (Web site rswww.com) do carry a number of vapour inhibitors, link to their web site for these:
http://rswww.com/cgi-bin/bv/rswww/searchBrowseAction.do?obs=sObs&name=SiteStandard&No=0&N=0&Ntk=I18NAll&Ntt=corrosion%20inhibitor&Nty=1&D=corrosion%20inhibitor&Ntx=mode%20matchpartial&Dx=mode%20matchpartial&callingPage=/jsp/search/search.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@0478292133.1178564181@@@@&BV_EngineID ceaddklgghdkkcefeceeldgkidhgl.0&cacheID=ukie&Nr=avl:uk
Hope this helps,
Bryan
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Bryan McCormick wrote:

You really don't want silicone anywhere near woodworking projects...it can do bad things to the finish.
Chris
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