Cordless drill jargon

Page 2 of 2  

foggytown wrote:

Negative, unless you have deep pockets.
Cordless drills, like everything else, start the march to the junk yard the day they come out of the box.
Better tools have a longer journey.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Sure, but when you can get a cheap 18V drill for $30, and a good one is $200, and a replacement battery is somewhere around $75...
I own a Porter-Cable cordless and would probably buy a better-quality one again. But it's because I think it just feels better and is probably tougher, not because I think it's any cheaper.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yes but when you use them everyday like I do. I don't have the time to take the march to the store. My PC 14.4 has been a loyal tool for over 3 years and I don't have a bad thing to say about it. I'm not sure I will be able to say the same if I ever have to replace it.
--
"you can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So what I think I'm hearing is that a cordless drill can be considered a "consumable". Buy a cheap-ish one that works and replace it when it gives up.
FoggyTown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
foggytown wrote:

Foggy, you're sort of right. It's highly doubtful that your grandchildren will treasure your cordless tools. BUT I still buy industrial quality instead of consumer quality, even though I know the batteries will fail and I'll buy a new one before the motor wears out. I just don't enjoy working with junk, even if I got a bargain on it.
However, I would caution against buying the biggest, baddest cordless you can find. There's some really heavy duty stuff out there - aimed at the guy who drills holes all day every day I guess. And the guy who wants to impress his friends. But you pay for that power many times. Once when you purchase it. And again every time it pulls your pants down while it's hanging from your belt.
DonkeyHody
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Think of it more like buying an automobile. In about 3 years you have to replace the battery. I have never worn out any of my cordless drills. That said, while I do not care for the weight of the Ridgid drills they do indeed now come with a lifetime warranty including the battery and charger.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
foggytown wrote:

In which case, considerations of ergonomics become more important and you want a drill that won't give you callouses and isn't annoyingly bulky or heavy for the kind of work you do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In theory, more volts = more power.
In practice, more volts also = more weight and larger size.
Don't buy more that you need just because bigger is better. I bought a 15.6V Panasonic because it was smaller, lighter, yet has more power than the 14V drills and some 18V drills. I use it for mostly light work drilling pilot holes, driving screws, etc. A 24V would be overkill.
Buy feature you like also. Some drills now have one hand chucks, a nice feature. Others just feel better in your hand and that can make a difference if you are doing a lot of drilling or standing on a ladder doing it. Last year I set out tot he store to buy either a Bosch, DW, or PC and came home with the Panasonic. It just felt that much better for me. In reality, for the work that I do, a 12V probably would to the job well.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fog, ol' chap, it's like the argument about loudspeakers. What is better a two-way or a three-way. Answer: A well designed two-way out performs a poorly designed three way.
Ergo:
A well designed 14volt is more desirable than a crap 18 volt. I handled the new Milwaukee 28vLithium Sure comes across as capable, but it is big and heavy. WAY more than my jobs ever need. (The worst I ever encounter is to core-bore 1 3/8" holes in countertops. (The worst I ever enCOUNTER..nyuk, snort!) What I would LIKE is a 14.4 volt Milwaukee impact driver... close-quatered 1/2" while we're at it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use a dewalt 18 v and have no complaints, lots of power and the batteries last a for a fair time before needing recharging. I looked at the 24v outfits and found them on the heavy side to be packing around all day so the 18v works for me, a friend has a 14 volt unit, after using my 18 v for the day he went out and bought an 18 v dewalt, I think the one he had was on its last legs anyway, not pushing dewalt it is just what I have . I think any of the good quality cordless drills will do a good job, the choice of 18v or 24 is a personal choice and perhaps depends on what type of work your planning on doing with it. If it is just for occasional use there are lots of low cost units out there with a guarantee that might work for you, But I think the 18v is still a good choice,

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.