compressor from garage sale

Page 5 of 5  


In other words, you're afraid that the tank might be on the verge of blowing up in your face, right?
Compression takes in poor condition, usually develop pinhole leaks first, which would indicate that it's time for you to replace it. Of course, you could replace it now, but most people continue to use them until they start to leak.
In other words, you can use it until there's a problem.
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Well, it may have had a pint/quart of water, but the rusting factor would d epend on the amount of oxygen reacting with the iron to produce a quantity of rust. In a closed container, the rust may be much less than if contents were exposed to more open air.
Not just open it, but can you remove the whole petcock assembly, without br eaking it? What size hole is in the tank, there, 1/2", 3/4"? If you can r emove the assembly, rinse out the tank, well, then rinse with denatured alc ohol. Allow to dry, as best it can, before reinstalling the petcock.
If I had a questionably badly rusted tank, I might entertain the idea of ri nsing/sloshing the bottom of the tank with muratic acid, to see what all mi ght be washed out. Rinse with water, afterwards. I would think the very bo ttom is rusted the most, if significantly.
Sonny
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wrote:

depend on the amount of oxygen reacting with the iron to produce a quantity of rust. In a closed container, the rust may be much less than if contents were exposed to more open air. An air tank has plenty of oxygen in it. High pressure == more oxygen.

breaking it? What size hole is in the tank, there, 1/2", 3/4"? If you can remove the assembly, rinse out the tank, well, then rinse with denatured alcohol. Allow to dry, as best it can, before reinstalling the petcock. It's just going to get "wet" again, at the first use. It's sorta unavoidable, unless you live in AZ. ;-)

rinsing/sloshing the bottom of the tank with muratic acid, to see what all might be washed out. Rinse with water, afterwards. I would think the very bottom is rusted the most, if significantly. That sounds like a really bad idea. The rust isn't going to hurt anything more than it already has. HCL does corrode steel, which is *not* useful. If the worry is polluting the air stream, filter it. If that doesn't work, filter it some more. ;-)
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On 5/5/2013 8:05 PM, Sonny wrote:

depend on the amount of oxygen reacting with the iron to produce a quantity of rust. In a closed container, the rust may be much less than if contents were exposed to more open air.

breaking it? What size hole is in the tank, there, 1/2", 3/4"? If you can remove the assembly, rinse out the tank, well, then rinse with denatured alcohol. Allow to dry, as best it can, before reinstalling the petcock.

rinsing/sloshing the bottom of the tank with muratic acid, to see what all might be washed out. Rinse with water, afterwards. I would think the very bottom is rusted the most, if significantly.

square drive to remove the 2 plugs, it would allow me to , the petcock I usually replace with 90 street and galv pipe to a ball valve. Don't understand petcocks.. pain the ass and the ball is worth the money to quickly release the water.
how do I neutralize the muriatic acid in the tank after, just water or baking soda... Will that clean off most of the loose rust?
--
Jeff

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On Sunday, May 5, 2013 8:57:31 PM UTC-5, woodchucker wrote:

Flush with water. It shouldn't take much acid (1-2 cups) to rinse/slosh th e bottom of the tank, where there would likely be the most rust. Concrete is cleaned with muratic acid and simply rinsed with water. The old saying is to add acid to water, to prevent a splattering reaction when mixing the two. In this situation, adding water to the acid (to neutralize it), insid e the tank, shouldn't be a problem, plus it would be difficult to pour out the acid, first, into a safe container without having it pour irradically f rom the petcock hole. Further, pour the mix into a 5 gal bucket of water, to further dilute it.

Maybe/yes, to some extent. I've used it to assist in removing rust on stuf f at home(shop) and used it on (our past) boat dock surfaces. Since you ca n't readily see inside the tank, we don't know if there is significant rust in there, or not. Muratic acid is more readily available, I think, and wi ll help loosen at least some rust without having to scrub, since you can't readily scrub the inside. Any potential loose rust may block the petcock, in the future, so removing the most you can is preferrable. Using acid is the easiest way, IMO, hence my entertaining the idea of using the acid as a "rinse" or possible (assistant) rust remover.
Summer jobs, during college days, I worked on a dredge boat/barge along the Gulf coast. There were times when we'd clean parts of the deck for repain ting. An acid was used to help remove (or treat?) the rusted areas. I don 't recall what acid was used. We'd slosh it on, do some minimal scrubbing, then rinse with water. On tough or deeply rusted areas, we'd use a grinde r to remove the rust, best we could. Apparently the acid "treatment" did s ome kind of good.
Muratic acid is pretty potent. If spilled on the outside of the tank, it w ill likely peel the paint off, fast.
Sonny
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wrote:

depend on the amount of oxygen reacting with the iron to produce a quantity of rust. In a closed container, the rust may be much less than if contents were exposed to more open air.

breaking it? What size hole is in the tank, there, 1/2", 3/4"? If you can remove the assembly, rinse out the tank, well, then rinse with denatured alcohol. Allow to dry, as best it can, before reinstalling the petcock.

rinsing/sloshing the bottom of the tank with muratic acid, to see what all might be washed out. Rinse with water, afterwards. I would think the very bottom is rusted the most, if significantly.

poke the camra in to see what it looks like. If you can't tell, rince the tank out untill it is clean and try again. Any significant pitting will show up.
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woodchucker wrote:

From Wikipedia:
--- begin quote Phosphoric acid may be used as a "rust converter", by direct application to rusted iron, steel tools, or surfaces. The phosphoric acid converts reddish-brown iron(III) oxide, Fe2O3 (rust) to black ferric phosphate, FePO4.
"Rust converter" is sometimes a greenish liquid suitable for dipping (in the same sort of acid bath as is used for pickling metal), but it is more often formulated as a gel, commonly called "naval jelly". It is sometimes sold under other names, such as "rust remover" or "rust killer". As a thick gel, it may be applied to sloping, vertical, or even overhead surfaces.
After treatment, the black ferric-phosphate coating can be scrubbed off, leaving a fresh metal surface. Multiple applications of phosphoric acid may be required to remove all rust. The black phosphate coating can also be left in place, where it will provide moderate further corrosion resistance (such protection is also provided by the superficially similar Parkerizing and blued electrochemical conversion coating processes).
--- end quote
This is how "black pipe" (used for natural gas distribution) is created.
And, from one blogger:
"Look for it as Metal Prep oluton. It's available at any lumber yard, borg, or hardware store in quarts and gallons in plastic bottles. I use Jasco out of blind brand loyalty but it' a good consistant product. It has tuff in it that makes it work better than the plain acid. I dilute it 10 to 1 in a 5 gallon pail. When the blue color fades the acid has pooped out so add more.
"It's sewer safe when exhausted. Or since the spent solution is mostly iron phosphate it makes good fertilizer. Run it through a proportioning squirt nozzle and water your flowers."
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On 5/5/2013 9:56 PM, HeyBub wrote:

--
Jeff

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wrote:

further rusting.
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I know it isn't near as much of an adventure when compared to acid washes, cleaning rust and sealing, ultrasound inspections, and all other kinds of solutions, but why not just buy a new tank and be done with it?
http://tinyurl.com/cptqhe4
You could even wait for the ever present 20% off coupon.
We have done this to several compressors over the years. I have seen tanks leak, but never rupture. What I see is tanks damaged badly enough from dropping the compressors while loading or unloading them for daily use, loading material on top of them, and then just plain wear and tear from carrying them from job to job.
To do this easily, the original tank assembly is bypassed or removed, and in some cases the motor/head is mounted to something else, and this tank along with a manifold is used to replace the original. You cannot mount a motor/head to this as purchased, so this is a perfect time to put the compressor in its own little corner and the tank out of the way. All you need to connect the two is inexpensive air hose.
Not as much fun as some of the ideas here, but if you leave the old compressor on its original pinnings, you can be up and running with one of these tanks in about 20 minutes. I have one of these (bought mine at Northern) and it works great. I like the extra tank capacity, too.
Robert
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