compressor from garage sale

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On Sat, 11 May 2013 14:33:19 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I agree. These weren't very sophisticated bombs. The nails and ball bearings were the only 'design' aspect part and intended to cause as much carnage as possible
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On 5/11/2013 1:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The lid was found about 200' down the street on top of about a 7 story building. The lid blew off and way up high.
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On 5/11/13 12:16 AM, Leon wrote:

The pressure cooker is a needed part of the bomb. The pressure relief

If that was the case, it would amount to a shaped charge, pointed

As to the context of our discussion, a 13-20 gallon compressor bursting from over pressurization isn't going to take off any legs or arms, let alone kill anyone.
These "pressure cooker bombs" seemed to do quite a good job at it, however.
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On 5/9/13 12:11 AM, CW wrote:

The only point that is pertinent in this discussion is that there is no blast powder in a compressor air tank. :-)
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wrote:

No, it needs containment or the power will just "flash". Again, it's a low-explosive.

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On Mon, 6 May 2013 17:14:58 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

ANd a pressure cooker is often made of CAST Aluminum - which is fragile / brittle in nature.
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It's very rare for an air compressor tank to violently explode. In cases where it did happen, usually there was defective construction, the the compressor had been modified, relief valve stuck closed, etc. A rusty tank will almost always fail with a pinhole leak or small crack. I would turn the compressor upside down and tap all over the bottom with a small hammer. You will hear or feel any thin spots.
You could also have it hydro-tested. This is a requirement for industrial pressure vessles over a certain size in most states but perhaps you could find someone willing to test your small compressor the same way. I think you could do a fair job of testing it yourself by filling the tank with water and then pressurizing it to about 10% over it's nominal pressure rating. Personally, I would be satisifed with the hammer-tap test.
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er

http://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/80175/sanborn2.pdf
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On Sun, 05 May 2013 17:45:26 -0500, -MIKE- wrote:

Well, it might just be the normal corporate CYA, but every compressor manual I've seen says to drain on a regular basis - like every time if you use it infrequently.
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On 5/5/2013 10:38 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

That just makes good sense too. and it is probably not just CYA,
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On 5/5/13 9:38 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

As I wrote, you don't drain it because of some perceived danger or rust build up. You drain it to improve performance of the pneumatic tools using the compressed air.
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On 05/05/2013 02:21 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Don't know about that stuff, but I put the HF automatic compressor drain on mine:
<http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=automatic+compressor+drain>
I did have to fart around and replace the plastic tubing with copper tubing. It's been working fine for about 12 years.
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On 5/5/2013 5:16 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I would believe that the question is not how much water or how much rust, but what is the remaining thickness of the metal making up the tank. If the tank has sit for years has the bottom nearly rusted through?
If it rusted and significantly decreased the thickness of the tank wall is it general or is it such that when it fails it will pin hole and leak slowly or fail catastrophically.
I have never seen a tank fail, but.................
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I saw one failed intentionally on TV. I think it was Time Warp where they dropped a 5 or 10 gallon tank off a building on to a spike. Big noise, lots of pressure released, and the tank went flying. Very fun to watch.
Puckdropper
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On Sun, 05 May 2013 17:34:29 -0400, Keith Nuttle

According to the inspector that does out tanks at work, they pin hole rather than explode. In MA, tanks have to be inspected every two years. They use an ultrasonic thing and it gives the wall thickness and can be done while running.
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When there's a lot of water in the tank, "hadn't been used for years" is waaaaay better than "used it every week".
Water, by itself, doesn't cause rust. For iron to rust, two things are necessary: water and oxygen. Once all the oxygen in the tank has been converted to iron oxide, there will be no further rusting.
Case in point: hydronic (hot water) heating systems -- such as the one in my house -- typically have cast-iron boilers, and many (mine included) have cast-iron radiators as well. Water normally sits in these systems for *decades* without any damage to the cast-iron components. Yes, there's some rusting internally, but not much. Once the small amount of dissolved oxygen is used up, the rusting process stops.
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On 5/5/2013 9:51 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Makes sense.
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On 5/5/2013 9:51 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

I would believe that a cast iron boiler is several times thicker that an air compressor tank. I am sure the radiator is.
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Indeed it is. But the water sits there longer, too. The point remains that once the oxygen in the system is used up, no further oxidation (read: rusting) can take place unless fresh oxygen is introduced.
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wrote:

May have been enough oil mixed in there so it was protected. The wet portion may be better than the dry portion.
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