Colonial Williamsburg

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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

positive untended consequence of putting one picture on each page--which
makes it easy to refer to them by number like Sonny did. Unfortunately, all of the non-vertical ones got "chopped-off in the print" (which is apparent because they came out square). If someone might like a 5MB photo, I will try to accommodate.
Sonny wrote: Pic 31 - I like the simpleness of that inlay on the door panel.... not co mplicated. Very elegant.
Sonny, It may surprise you that Pic 31 is from the grandfather clock havi ng the pineapple motif--Pic 50 and 51! I was only able to tell by going back to the original order from the camera. I left that as a "challenge p roblem" on purpose! Ha! (not really) In this case, it might be true t hat the "simplicity" you refer to adds balance, so as to not overwhelm wi th what is already an "ominous presence".
I learned there was a fair amount of "trying to out-do" your neighbor in this affluent colonial town. At the very least, "making impressions" matt ered to them. I learned alot of other things too, and recommend the trip (further details below). It was demonstrated for me more than once how a "good question" (like one illustrating you already knew a molding plane when you saw one) significantly raised the whole quality of the conversat ion. Erwin Wright, and his studies in the cabinet makers shop, were gener ous with their time and taught me quite a few things I found interesting. To give you an example, I found it interesting how the whole "framed mo lding top" of a "large item like a scrolled desk" slid right off (with ni ce unglued joinery of course) so that the large unit, which looked like i t surely must be 2 pieces, was really 3 pieces. I don't know if that was the norm, or not. If I had thought of it I would have asked.
Admission to the grounds is about $40/day and about $50.99 for an all-ye ar pass. Motel prices were very fair I thought (about $65/night with coup ons I picked up at a state welcome center). Arriving early in the morning , it was very pleasant to walk the grounds in relative silence (my wife f ed an apple apiece to the horses--who I expect would still remember her i f she returned with more apples!). The school buses seemed to arrive at 1 :00 or 2:00. We were there 3 days, the 3rd requiring an umbrella. The fir st two days were great, the 3rd was okay but soggy--suggest you plan acco rdingly. Each day has different "events" scheduled.
Bill
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On Sunday, April 12, 2015 at 8:29:50 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

ve you an example, I found it interesting how the whole "framed molding top " of a "large item like a scrolled desk" slid right off (with nice unglued joinery of course) so that the large unit, which looked like it surely must be 2 pieces, was really 3 pieces. I don't know if that was the norm, or n ot. If I had thought of it I would have asked.
Piece-mealing or the mating of parts, that way, is often done today, as in the past. I built the entertainment center with the crown assembly remove able, that way, as with my latest project, the rustic gun cabinet-China hut ch. It's easier to move, when the whole (total weight and bulk) is reduced to pieces. With gravity holding things in place, no need to securly att ach/glue things together. https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/16506501850/in/photostream
Similarly, pegging or keying things together, allowing for quick assembly/d isassembly, was common with the arts & craft/art nouveau movement, as well. ... Roycroft and Stickley are noted names in that (later than "Williamsburg ") era, the keys being elements of design. http://www.bookcasedealers.com /Item/-87673576/89-080 My trestle table (project still not completed) has the legs and trestle boa rd keyed together.

I did notice the legs on that clock.... pretty amazing. I wondered, during construction, how many legs broke, before "good ones" stood the test of we ight bearing.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

Thank you for your reply, Sonny. Let the legs on that clock are "pretty amazing" (folks seem to place a lot of confidence in them!) : ) It's interesting to think about the number of different craftsmen who have work in that clock. IIRC, The museum does not even know who originally owned any of those grandfather clocks.
Bill
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On 4/12/2015 9:14 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

--
Jeff

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wrote:

available at any price - and it's FREE.
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