Cleaning up an old table saw

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There's an old Craftsman table saw in the basement of the building my Dad had his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.
I know that Craftsman is held in low regard here, but perhaps I can prevail on the nice folks here for some advice.
Rust: The main table surface had a fair amount of surface rust, but hardly any "bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.
I went at it with Scotch-Brite and a rotary wire brush. The main table surface came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.
I had doused the whole thing pretty liberally with WD-40 a couple of weeks ago, before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.
Any better ideas?
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 13:45:50 -0800 (PST), Greg Guarino

Boeshield T-9 Protectant and Lubricant http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pP252&cat=1,43415,43440
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Does it have cast iron wings or stamped metal? If cast iron, it is probably more like 40+ years old and you might have one of the older, better Craftsman saws. Many of the iron extension tables had a open triangular grid design. If it is one of the older ones it probably has a cast fence vs the sheet metal fence of the 70's and later saws. Craftsman did make pretty good machine tools prior to the 1970's when they apparently sold out to their accountants.
Try naval gel, scotchbrite and lots of elbow grease. BUT make sure you get the gel off because it can corrode.
RonB
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"RonB" wrote in message wrote:

Does it have cast iron wings or stamped metal? If cast iron, it is probably more like 40+ years old and you might have one of the older, better Craftsman saws. Many of the iron extension tables had a open triangular grid design. If it is one of the older ones it probably has a cast fence vs the sheet metal fence of the 70's and later saws. Craftsman did make pretty good machine tools prior to the 1970's when they apparently sold out to their accountants.
Try naval gel, scotchbrite and lots of elbow grease. BUT make sure you get the gel off because it can corrode. ===========================================================Navel jelly will etch the surfaces. Just kerosene and scotchbrite. No matter if the metal gets shiny or not, smooth is what you are after.
RonB
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 13:45:50 -0800 (PST), Greg Guarino

his office in. It's probably 30 years old, and never saw much use. I'm trying to fix it up a bit to use it on occasion.

"bubbling". The "wings", if that's the right term were more badly rusted around the edges, which had been bare metal.

came out passably well, I think. The wing edges still look rusty, but I flattened them down enough, I think.

before I did any brushing. So now I have a slurry of rust particles and WD-40 covering the table top. I could use some sort of degreaser to get it off, but then I imagine I'd need to cover it with something to keep it from rusting again. Wax, I'm thinking.

As RonB noted some of the older C'man table saws were not bad at all. You may have a keeper.
Clean your "slurry" off with paper towels and paint thinner (PT) (assuming you have adequate ventalation). Feel the metal with the palm of your hand. Think "smooth" rather than "flat" - it's unlikely that your scothbrite action has made it much less flat than it was to start with. If you find rough spots or see obvious rust (not pitting, but rust) try naval jelly (as RonB suggested) or a product called RustFree from the makers of Boeshield T-9. in extremous, don't be afraid to use 400 grit wet-dry sandpaper on a flat block lubed with PT. Just get the rust off or it WILL spread.
Once it's rust free, clean again with PT. Someone suggested Boeshield T-9 as a top coat. It's great stuff for rust prevention, but it's not real slick. Johnson's paste wax works fine, but needs to be redone after use as it wears off quickly where the boards slide over it. I use Bostick TopCote on my saws, jointer, planer table, etc. and have been very happy. It's slick, it lasts, and I have no problems with rust. I do rub the surfaces down with white metal polish (a 9" orbital buffer works great!), clean with PT, and redo the TopCote every 3 or 4 months, but that is, for me, just basic field maintenance.
Regards.
Tom
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 16:58:07 -0600, Tom wrote:

Topcote is great stuff. But wax (I use Trewax) works fine and seems to build in the pores over time. When I wax a new saw I have to redo soon as you say. After the first few times though, the interval gradually increases from weekly to monthly to quarterly to annually.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 23:11:47 -0500, Mike Marlow wrote:

I have never seen any rust on my 1948 Delta saw except when I first rescued it at an estate sale. And it was minimal then despite having set outside under a canopy for at least a year. I have no idea what the prior owner(s) used on the top, if anything, but all I've ever used is wax.
Makes me wonder if old cast iron was more resistant than the new stuff.
The top does have this nice patina that old metal gets and that collectors adore. Maybe that helps protect it.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 13:55:51 -0500, Mike Marlow wrote:

Yes and no. I'm in eastern WA and our wet/dry seasons are reversed. Humidity is very low in the summer and quite high in the winter. I just checked and the current humidity here is 76%.
With the dry summers we don't get much sweating of the metal but in the winter we do get condensation.
But as I mentioned in another post, it's filling the pores with wax that is probably responsible for the lack of rust.
--
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On 2/12/2012 6:56 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

As said humidity is not necessarily the culprit, as the percent humidity is a function of the ambient temperature and the dew point. The % humidity is a compares the dew point to the air temperature. A 76% humidity at 50F is not the same as a 76% humidity at 80F.
The dew point is the most important measure of water in the air. When the dew points reach 76F, it does not matter what the temperature it is, it is going to be uncomfortable, and you are more likely to have condensation.
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On 2/12/2012 6:22 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

And to take that a little further, Humid day and warm so the metal is warm. A cold front blows in bringing a 20 degree temperatures in 15 minutes. That cool air hitting the warm iron results in almost instant condensation on the iron.
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Generally, warm and moist air hitting a cool surface is what cuases condensation on the cool object. Cool air hitting a warm surface does NOT give condensation.
--
Best regards
Han
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On 2/13/2012 7:12 AM, Han wrote:

Bull Shit!
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wrote:

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On 2/13/2012 7:50 AM, Leon wrote:

It's the condensing surface that needs to be at or below the dewpoint temperature to cause condensation irrespective of absolute temperature(s).
That's why moisture condenses on the tea glass surface--it's below the dewpoint in the room at a comfortable or even, perhaps, cool temperature.
--
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On 2/13/2012 7:59 PM, dpb wrote:

That is ice tea. Remember there are those on this newsgroup that drink tea hot.
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On Tue, 14 Feb 2012 18:10:49 -0500, Keith Nuttle

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On 2/13/2012 7:50 AM, Leon wrote:

Sorry Han, To explain my response, and where I have witnessed your second statement being not true "all of the time" is in Swingman's shop.
I understand how the condensation principal works.
BUT a few years ago Swingman and I were working in his shop, it had been quite warm. We had a cold front blow in suddenly at the end of the day and the temperature dropped quickly. "Heavy" Condensation formed on the iron machine surfaces with in minutes, something we do not often see.
Why? I have no idea.
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Did you have the windows open, it got cold (and the iron cooled down), then you shut the windows and opened the doors to the rest of the humid, warm house?
--
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Han
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On 2/14/2012 6:54 AM, Han wrote:

No windows, detached uninsulated garage, just a 16' garage door that had been open all day and a rear side door that was open for the 3' fan to create a breeze through the shop. At the end of the day the front blew in and almost immediately, 10 minutes, "puddles" ow water formed on the cast iron surfaces. I started wiping the water off of the first casulty, ;~) before Swingman noticed what was happening, he was still finishing up with something on the TS. We both had to stop what we were doing to wipe the surfaces off.
Now the iron might have gotten cold but this all happened in a matter of a few minutes and the the whole shop cooled down before closing the doors.
It all was a bit freaky, I had never seen condensation form that quickly in such a great quantity.
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