Cleaning Debris From Drill Flutes Between Plunges

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I have a customer working in a material that sticks in the flutes of the drill between strokes and doesn't necessarily cause problems, but could...
They want to physically remove the material between strokes without stopping the rotation of the tooling. I told them to try a very high pressure air blast nozzle on the tooling but they want a physical method that runs down the flutes, etc.
Any such tool exist?
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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will push material up the flutes, not down them. How about some sacrificial medium that has enough "body" to push out the waste, but is soft enough to not overly dull your drill? Or a medium that lubricates the bit to use before each drilling, to keep the offending substance from sticking?
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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on 5/19/2008 2:29 PM Joe AutoDrill said the following:

In a manufacturing process that uses drills, they use a water based lubricant that is constantly applied to the drill.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Imagine you are drilling over a well finished piece of MDF and for some reason, the MF you drill sticks in the flutes and causes problems... I need to clear the offending "stuck stuff" without contaminating the part below. Coolant is good for some plastics, almost all metals and a variety of other materials, but this customer has a substance that is both absorbant and "stainable" and not powerdery like some woods... Tough problem if the air blast doesn't work... I thought maybe there was something similar to the cogsdill that expanded on retraction to force the removal of debris, etc. Expensive to design, but possibly sellable to this customer.
BTW if it matters, the customer will pay $10k+ for my machines and drill every 4-5 seconds so this is not a hobby-like application.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

You haven't said the depth or diameter or whether it's a through hole--if it's six inches across and a sixteenth of an inch deep the available options are different from if it's a sixteenth of an inch in diameter and six inches deep.
Have you determined the process that is resulting in the sticking (like is something melting and solidifying or is there a permanently tacky layer within the workpiece or is it all just naturally sticky--what works for one problem won't necessarily work for another).
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--John
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Also BTW, the best answer we've had yet is to use inverter rated motors, slow and stop them on the retract, reverse their rotation at a slow speed whole a brush probes the flutes and forces the debris down and out of the drill. Then retract the brush and reverse back up to full RPM... Quite a "How It's Made" opportunity. <grin>
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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Work with vacuum at the drill bit + short stiff brush like dead or new tooth brush. Keep hands away. Retract drill frequently whilst all of this is going on. If the work is not clamped down and against a fence you will be in for an ER visit.
Drills>>> far more than routs:|www.patwarner.com *********************************************************************************8

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This is for an automated process with no manual inputs. automatically loaded part, stroked machine, etc... No human interaction within 30'
So it has to be some type of automated process... Or a very tiny person with lots of health and life insurance and a death wish.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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On Mon, 19 May 2008 19:35:17 +0000, Joe AutoDrill wrote:

How about changing the bit(s)?
This looks like it deals with the chip clearance/no clogging issue better than a standard wood drill would..
<http://www.bamanufacturing.com/rrh_series.html
Are they definitely closed to any sort of non-mechanical process like through-coolant lubrication that might cut down on the clogging?
There are quite a few patents that talk about anti-clogging and clog- clearing devices so somebody out there must have actually made one at some point - they can't all be patent trolls, can they?
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"Joe AutoDrill" wrote:

Sounds pretty straight forward to automate.
Think 1" dia, automation cylinders and 80-100 PSIG shop air.
Lew
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: I have a customer working in a material that sticks in the flutes of the : drill between strokes and doesn't necessarily cause problems, but could...
: They want to physically remove the material between strokes without stopping : the rotation of the tooling. I told them to try a very high pressure air : blast nozzle on the tooling but they want a physical method that runs down : the flutes, etc.
Here's an idea:
I'm picturing a simple twist bit drill bit.
Take a ball bearing with inner diameter larger than the drill bit. Place wire brushes on the inside that fits around the shank of the drill bit and into the flutes. The brushes have to be soft/flexible enough not to dull the bit, but firm enough to clean out the flutes. The collar sits on the drill bit above the work piece. The inside of the bearing is "attached" to the drill bit by the friction and pressure of the brushes, and the outside of the bearing is attached to an arm that holds it above the workpiece.
When the drill bit spins up, the inner collar spins with it, since it is not fixed to anything other than the drill bit. The brushes are stationary with respect to the spinning drill bit (spinning at the same speed). When the drill moves down into the work piece and up out of it, the brushes follow the flutes and clean out the gunk.
Let me know how this works,
--- Chip
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wrote:

Chip,
You make it and I'll try to sell it to my customer... Seriously.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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: > When the drill bit spins up, the inner collar spins with it, since it : > is not fixed to anything other than the drill bit. The brushes are : > stationary with respect to the spinning drill bit (spinning at the : > same speed). When the drill moves down into the work piece and up out : > of it, the brushes follow the flutes and clean out the gunk.
: You make it and I'll try to sell it to my customer... Seriously.
Sorry, sounds too much like work. Besides, my father's the automated production machinery designer. I'm the computer guy.
If you're having trouble visualizing it I'll send you a drawing.
--- Chip
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into the flutes. Disk would be constrained from vertical movement by fixed plates above and below the disk (with bearings either on these fixed plates or in the disk, so that the disk can be constrained from vertical movement but still be allowed to spin freely with the drill). on the return stroke after drilling, the drill would retract as far as it can leaving the disk just engaged, and the disk will sweep out the debris.
I'll call to give you address to send the royalty payments. ;-)
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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LOL... Royalty... You can't prove a royal bloodline in an e-mail! <G>
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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Does it have to be a standard twist drill ? For instance:
1.A flat spade bit doesn't hold wood chips as much as a twist drill. 2. How about a spiral router bit instead of the drill ? The flutes are more open on them. 3. Have you tried putting a hard teflon coat on the drill bit (like the frying pan coating) ?
If all of these fail or are not acceptable for some reason then you will likely need to use a reversable motor and install a cleaning brush on an actuator that engages and follows the drill flutes down when the motor is reversed to clean the bit. This would be done while the drill spindle is in it's retracted position. This would add a cleaning cycle after each hole was drilled, but it should be able to be done in just a few seconds.
Charley (retired automation engineer)
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Mustbe standard twist drill but can (and probably will be coated, etc.)

Not yet. First discussion about the process was 3 days ago. "Testing" of sorts starts in a week with a drill press.

Agreed. Inverter rated and programmed with a PLC, this should be easy to do with a solenoid activated valve, air stroked brush, etc.
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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Normally I simply touch the bit with my finger or a piece of wood while it is spinning. That is probably not going to be a reasonable solution.
What if the bit was Teflon coated.

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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

I use a soft wire brush. A rotating wire brush might do the job while the drill is rotating.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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Good thought, Gerald... Maybe make the brush(s) inside some type of rotating collar/drill guide, so that the bit passes through it on both the in and out stroke?
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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