Clamping Cauls

Page 1 of 2  
I'm thinking of making some dedicated clamping cauls out of maple, and was wondering about dimensions. Say I use 8/4 stock, how "tall" should they be, and given that thickness and height, to what radius should I round them? (They'll be 40" in length.) I'm planning on making up a template for them, and then shaping them with a router. Any rule of thumb for this? (heh. any boondock saints fans?) JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All right, I've done a bit of googling and found a few different techniques for estimating how much crown to use. Now for the math jocks. I'd like to have my cauls be of a constant radius, so I can use the whole length or any portion thereof. If I want to have a 40" length with a crown of 1/10" in the middle, I'm drawing an arc of what radius? Thanks.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2000.05 inches (166 feet 8.05 inches)
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 29, 9:56 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Oh. I'm gonna need a bigger trammel. JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There are other methods to use. A trammel is great for a direct cut, but there really are other ways to get this.
FWW had an article in there mag a couple of years ago called "Cutting big curves"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Radius = 2000.05 inches.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay Pique (in snipped-for-privacy@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com) said:
| I'm thinking of making some dedicated clamping cauls out of maple, | and was wondering about dimensions. Say I use 8/4 stock, how | "tall" should they be, and given that thickness and height, to what | radius should I round them? (They'll be 40" in length.) I'm | planning on making up a template for them, and then shaping them | with a router. Any rule of thumb for this? (heh. any boondock | saints fans?)
You can find a "rule of thumb" at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/CNC/cove_geom.html
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can cut them much faster on a table saw. Put one board on top of another, screw through one end into the board below. Now, etiher by hand or using C clamps or whatever, bow the top board so it's now-bowed edge extends over the lower board. While it's stressed like this, screw down the other end to the lower board. Then cut on tablesaw, & voila, one curved board. (Not sure, credit to FWW I think)
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

Wouldn't that result in a board that is 'skinnier' in the middle? I thought that for a clamping caul you wanted the board to be 'thicker' in the middle.
Maybe I'm confused about what you are describing, though...
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on which side of the bow you cut on. Cut on the concave side, and it's thicker in the middle; cut on the convex side, and it's thicker at the ends.

You do.

The description sounds like cutting on the convex side, which is not what you want. Using the same technique, though, and cutting on the concave side, seems to me that it should work just fine.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

whatever, if one board is skinnier in the middle, waht does that make the board it was cut from? Actually, it doesn't matter, IMHO ideal would be a caul that was curved and of equal thickness & width (Kind of like HD lumber but more consistent :) ). Sometimes with a caul, you may want to put a clamp at each end; then you want the convex side facing against the "clampee" Other times, a single clamp in the middle will be adequate; then, you would want the concave side of the caul against the workpiece.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 29, 11:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

Maybe someone with a CNC router could start selling templates. Until then, I think this is the way to go.
JP
PS: I'll give someone $40 for a 4' CNC'd arc with a 2000.05" radius. Plus shipping. 3/8 or 1/2 inch baltic birch or similar plywood. Seriously.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay Pique (in snipped-for-privacy@79g2000cws.googlegroups.com) said:
| On Nov 29, 11:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote: || You can cut them much faster on a table saw. Put one board on top || of another, screw through one end into the board below. Now, || etiher by hand or using C clamps or whatever, bow the top board so || it's now-bowed edge extends over the lower board. While it's || stressed like this, screw down the other end to the lower board. || Then cut on tablesaw, & voila, one curved board. (Not sure, credit || to FWW I think) | | Maybe someone with a CNC router could start selling templates. | Until then, I think this is the way to go. | | JP | | PS: I'll give someone $40 for a 4' CNC'd arc with a 2000.05" radius. | Plus shipping. 3/8 or 1/2 inch baltic birch or similar plywood. | Seriously.
Would you like a 40" arc in a 48" piece - or the arc across the entire 48"? I'd be happy to take you up on that if you'll accept 1/4" tempered hardboard or spring for the BB.
The 1/4" material is less expensive to buy and ship; and can be used to produce additional templates out of whatever you'd /really/ like. [ B'sides, I already have the hardboard in the shop :-) ]
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris, check your email. JP

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay Pique wrote:

I think you're all getting carried away. I just took a hand plane and cut what seemed to be adequate. Been using them for years. Don't overcomplicate things.
-- It's turtles, all the way down
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 16:10:18 -0800, Larry Blanchard

You beat me to it. For that slight of a curve and given that cauls are not german timepieces, eyeball it with a #5 and start gluing.
Dave Hall
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It'll cost you a hundred bucks just to turn mine on.
() wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CW (in asLbh.5170$ snipped-for-privacy@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net) said:
| It'll cost you a hundred bucks just to turn mine on.
Your machine beats the daylights out of mine for precision...
...but mine turns on a lot easier :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wish I had one like yours sometimes though.
said:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jay Pique wrote:

Take a look here http://www.newwoodworker.com/ they got complete instructions on making them plus lots of other hints. Jim
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.