Circular saw blade tip grinds


What tip grind should be used where. I see flat, combination, ATB alternate tip bevel, ... What should I use for 1.solid birch, 2. birch plywood, 3. melamine paricle board
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Flat is best for ripping; ATB is best for crosscuts and manufactured products; Combination is a good compromise for a lot of work.
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Owen Lowe
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mark wrote:

Ripping, flat Crosscut, ATB

Triple chip

Ax. Just kidding, triple chip. Both the ply and this may need scoring first.
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There's a little bit more to it than just tooth grind. Hook angle also plays a part in the finished cut. Go to http://www.freudtools.com/woodworkers/woodworkers.shtml Look at Blades and Bits 101 for a good glossary of terms, then go to Saw Blades and look at the various Industial blades. There's a good decription of each including what it was specifically designed to do (note the different grinds and hook angles). Not just a marketing pitch for Freud but a pretty good primer on saw blades. The terminology is standard and should apply to anyone's blades. Freud's claim to fame is their laser-cut tensioned plates, the patented laser-cut anti vibrasion slots, their 'perma-sheild' coating, and the high quality and amount of carbide on the teeth. In my experience they're as good as anyone's premium blade including Forrest. I think Forrest's claim to fame is the final polish they put on the carbide, you can acually cut yourself on one of their blades if you pick it up wrong. I know my Freud blades really perform after Forest sharpens them and yes, I think its worth the extra money not to have some local grind off half your carbide and give you back a blade that isn't as sharp as new.

alternate
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Sat, Feb 4, 2006, 2:34pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@islandtelecom.com (mark) doth mumble: What tip grind should be used <snip>
Maybe things have changed, but the last time I bought a circular saw blade, the package had printing on it that told me what the blade inside it was suited for; i.e., plywood, solid wood - cosscutting, ripping, general purpose -, melanine, etc. Have they stopped doing that?
JOAT Have a nice day! Someplace else.
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