China Ply

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group rec.woodworking:

I recently make a cabinet for a client, using 3/4" Chinese plywood, to fit in an alcove he built himself. I missed the spot where the wall bowed in by 3/4", so my cabinet wouldn't slide into the opening. I muttered a few words to myself about never again trusting amateur wallboard work (or professional), and broke out the belt sander. I took more that 1/8" off of each side of the cabinet, and it finally JUST slipped in.
The point of this is that after I got through the veneer layer, I started seeing shiny spots in the glue, with more in the second glue layer. Since there's no good reason to introduce metal shavings into a wood product, they must be in there because of a shoddy manufacturing process. Either that, or they're using plywood as a cheap way to get rid of industrial waste.
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Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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Quite often I see sparks fly from American made MDF.
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Seriously?!
Reclaimed jarrah seems to be the sparkiest wood for me!
JP
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Seriousely.
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"Leon" wrote:

I have a customer who makes MDF.
Will have to ask them the next time we talk.
Lew
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Steve wrote:

I wouldn't have thought of anybody using Chinese plywood as cabinet wood. My impression was that it was being sold as construction grade.
And why would the Chinese want to be getting rid of metal shavings that could be melted down and made into stuff to sell?
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--John
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