Cherry Flooring

Looking for stores/mills in the Pacific Northwest for 3/4" 5-inch unfinished select American Cherry hardwood flooring. Thanks.
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Did I read correctly??
You want to use Cherry wood on a floor?? Are you planning on not walking on it with shoes? (take a piece of wood, use your thumb nail and try to make an indentation, now think about a woman in high heels.)
If I remember right, 6 years ago I priced making a dining room table to be about $600.00 + for raw stock solid cherry, so a whole floor would be about .....

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Here's my experience:
I put down vertical-grain cherry in my office and in my guest cottage. It's true that it's a bit soft, but we're a 'shoes-off' house, and the casters on the office chairs run are on area rugs, so we're not having too much of a problem so far. If I let an office chair run off of the rug I can see marks on the flooring, so I'm pretty careful. The floor's so fine-looking that I think it's worth a little extra care.
The wood I used is something they call 'backer', and if memory serves I got it for about $2.00 per board foot from Edensaw in Port Townsend, Washington. It's a slice right through the middle of the tree, so you end up with vertical grain boards. You need to discard the center of the board and the sap wood, so by the time you've milled it out the price is up to around $2.50 per board foot. I managed to get mostly 4" and 5" widths, with a few at 3". I milled it square edged, so as to keep as much width as I could, and put it down with screws, and then plugged the screw holes with plugs that I cut out of the offcuts. It gives an effect much like a boat deck.
Tom Dacon

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On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 18:29:42 -0400, "GrayBeardPhil" <nospamphil@one two three n-o-maps.net> wrote:

Here in New England, they even use pine for floors.
Barry
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Nooooo, not that <g>. I am also planning on using cherry unfinished 3/4 stock for my kitchen floor. What turned me on to it was seeing a cherry floor in a house (random widths). I would suspect the house was 10 years old or so. The floors were beautiful. Slightly distressed but that is what turned me on. Before I saw the cherry floor, my heart had been set on cvg fir. I like the distressed look personally. SH
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The flooring guy that did our new house said that pine was getting to be hip. I'd asked about it because I thought it would be suitable for my workshop - but he charges more for the pine flooring than anything else (at least more than oak, cherry, or birch (what we ended up going with in the rest of the house - jury's still out on the workshop)).
- Al
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wrote:

A builder buddy of mine just did a redwood floor in his own house. It's really cool looking! I'd never heard of it before he did it.

Try Tavern grade oak. It's solid oak, but with tight knots, color imperfections, etc... It looks great in a shop, and can be had for $0.99 / sq/ft in many locales.
For that matter, investigate the lower grades of ash, maple or birch. Many flooring shops only offer select and clear grade unless you ask.
Barry
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Please_keep_it_in_the snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Thanks, good ideas. I just saw my first redwood floor myself - hadn't heard of it either. You're right, it looks great - really rich. - Al
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My brother used that stuff. About 5" wide, random length. Sure was a lot easier than the 1 3/8" stuff we put in his previous house. Got to think about all the nailing.
Wes
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GrayBeardPhil wrote:

My first house had oak floors with a 1" strip of inlaid cherry about 12" from the walls (and arabesque around the living room fireplace hearth). The floors had had no care for the previous eleven years; and were in rough condition.
The cherry had not fared noticably worse than the oak. I sanded the whole works with a 5" portable belt sander; and we applied seven coats of urethane (sanding the penultimate with 600 grit silicon carbide) and not only was it beautiful - but the entire floor, oak and cherry both, stayed beautiful.
The cherry added a wonderful touch of warmth.

A "brute force" purchase might be expensive. On the other hand, sometimes a little networking, hunkering, horse-trading, etc. pays off quite well...
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Take a peek here http://www.cwghardwoodoutlet.com/flooring/display.html
http://www.cwghardwoodoutlet.com/flooring/naturalcherry.htm
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (CKY) wrote:

For Oregon area: My first try would be Crosscut Hardwoods in Portland and Seattle. Second try would be towards Hardwood Industries in Tualatin, Oregon plus other locations. Third shot would be Moxon Hardwood in Portland.
I'm positive both Crosscut and H.I. have web presences for contact and location plus maybe more detailed info on what you're looking for.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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(CKY) wrote:

Hello, I have cherry in my bedroom, which also doubles as an office, so it's not exactly low traffic. I also do not have a "shoes off" kind of house. I'm not sure why some of you are having so many problems with wearability. I've sold a lot of cherry flooring,as well, and havn't had anyone complain. Honestly, it's my favorite floor. I have red oak, ash, hickory, red elm, and hard maple, too. The cherry is holding up fine, but the rest could use a fresh coat. Maybe it's just that the cherry hides flaws better because it's darker. Incidently, I can't stand the hard maple. It shows everything. One trick I've learned though is to use oil based finishes. I start with a high gloss, which is harder than satin and, because it's thinner, will soak into the wood more and harden it. I then follow up with a couple of coats of satin because it doesn't show the scratches as much. I tell my customers to do this as well. Maybe that's why I don't have any problems with cherry. I actually took pictures for my website of my floor and the finish was 5 years old. Jana
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