Changing 14" bandsaw blade

I'm just curious. What is the process you go through when you change your 14" bandsaw blade (Delta, Jet, Grizzly, etc) ? And especially when you go from one type/size to another. Also how long does it take you to make the changes needed? Thanks, Grant
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My first blade change took about 30 minutes, second one about 15, now they are less than 10 minutes. The instruction book will have the steps in it.
(order not very particular) Loosen guides Loosen tension Remove blade cover Remove the tapered pin Take blade out and fold it (I have a video from FWW if you need it)
Replace blade Follow the reverse of above. now you have to adjust the guides carefully for the particular blade. Check tracking, tension.
After setting up my brand new saw, I was hoping I've never have to change the blade because it was so time consuming and exacting, but, just like sex, once you do it it gets easier and faster.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Faster??
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If you take too long think of all the time in the shop you miss. I'm right, aren't I? ')
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We all have priorities, Ed, but when I put the shop before sex, shoot me..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 03:10:09 GMT, the inscrutable "Mark Jerde"

If you have to be _told_, Mark, it's time you practiced more. That'll refresh your memory. ;)
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STOP LIVING LIKE VEAL
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Thanks Ed, I was just curious as to what others thought about the time it takes to change blades. I don't do it often, only twice so far, but it seems to take a fair amount of time and tweaking compared to most other wood tools.
I was hoping for some insight that might make me faster at it.
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First time, about 15 minutes. Now, less than 5 minutes. Unplug the saw. The guides, blocks, tracking, tension, co planer wheels, tires, table angle are all carefully checked. A scrap piece is sawn. Taking the time to do all the checks should improve the cut and your safety.
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Now... that does my describe my sex life .. and that includes the blade changing time....
Phisherman wrote:

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Grant wrote:

On my Delta 14":
1.) Remove power
2.) Back off the guides
3.) Pull the table pin
4.) Drop the tension
5.) Open the doors and change the blade, rotating by hand to check tracking after adding a touch of tension.
6.) Add tension until blade sings proper pitch
7.) Adjust the guides
8.) Replace the table pin
9.) Verify my 90 degree table stop
10.) Fire 'er up
11.) Make a quickie test cut and fine tune tension, etc...
I can usually do this in under 5 minutes, often along the lines of 3. It probably took longer to write it. I use Cool Blocks running right against the blade, so guide adjustment is a snap. After a few run throughs, adjusting the rear guide becomes an eyeball affair.
Once my wheels were made coplanar, and the first heavy duty tune-up was completed, blade changes are a snap.
If only I can get the hang of folding blades. <G>
Barry
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Barry,
I use the Cool Blocks on my Delta 14" and was curious if you "file" the back of the blade as some have recommended especially when using the Cool Blocks. I don't put the blocks right up to the blade but rather set them about the thickness of a piece of paper away from the blocks.
And if you can fold a blade without getting cut up, you are a better man for it.
Thanks. John

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the top of the loop, and twist as you go down. It will (usually) fold right up. Unfolding a 3/4" 93" blade is another proposition.
Steve
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Barry... think gloves and long sleeves..
(I found a space on the wall behind the garage door hinges to hang pegs, so I don't fold 'em)

mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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mac davis wrote:

I do. As I loop it, the teeth always seem to catch on each other.
Barry
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On Thu, 10 Feb 2005 18:52:25 GMT, B a r r y

ow.. that's a bad thing... skin grows back, saw teeth don't!
mac
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John M wrote:

I'm one of the "filers". <G> I use an old Arkansas stone or grinding wheel.

Why? Cool blocks are designed to be run close, the gap is typically used with steel blocks.
Barry
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Interesting. I will try that.
I ask as I just put them on last night so I pulled them out of the sealed package and read the directions (believe it or not) and it stated specifically to leave a gap. I was curious as I was under the impression that you stated - run 'em close.
Thanks, I will change that tonight as I have to re-saw some mahogany to make a valentine's gift.
--
John


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Boy, I'm a slacker. I just turn off the band saw's motor (safer if a bit slower) and fit the new blade on the wheels and rotate one wheel by hand as the blade climbs fully on. I don't worry about taking off the tension, I think I adjusted the tension about 6 years back. Tension adjustment is some kinda black art that I never mastered, so I ignore it mostly. I do check the blocks and bearings for adjustment, but they hardly ever need it, though I replaced one bearing last year. I use about 6 blades per year (always the same size) and each cuts a few thousand lineal feet of 5/4 hardwood, mostly red oak and cherry. I like 1/4 inch blades 4 tooth hook style. Sometimes I remember to put a grindstone on the table and round the back of the running blade a bit. I tried cool blocks and even made my own of Lignum Vitae, but the ordinary stock steel blocks seem best and the least hassle. My saw runs about an hour at a time and works pretty hard, harder than me anyway. About the time the blade starts to dull it snaps from metal fatigue. Five minutes later I'm back in business. Most of that five minutes is in finding my supply or extra blades. I do keep a couple of dull blades hanging on the wall for the times when that jerk in purchasing forgets to order new ones. I'd fire him but then I'd lose my toymaker, my janitor, my bookkeeper, shipping clerk, telecommunications operator, web designer, etc. Being a one man band sure makes it hard to pass the buck.
I use the band saw daily and more than any tool except my sanders. Couldn't get by without it. Whoever Grizzly uses to make their blades (in Missouri I think) does a good job. I have used them for about 5 years with no problems. I used to use Olson but drifted away. No real complaints.
john the toymaker
4 decades and still making sawdust every weekday and a few nice toys occasionally
Come see if you like, <http://www.woodentoy.com
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