CAD program - Where to begin

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On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 18:03:43 -0600, Reaper wrote:

The `right direction'? What if you want to draw a line 30 units long at 75 from some point?
@30<75
That's using polar co-ordinates. You can also use rectangular co-ordinates. Eg. A line that projects vertically down 30 units:
@0,-30
It's often quicker then stuffing around with snaps ie. your snap might be set at every 50 units.
Obviously you have to pick your start point first. You can do that either with the mouse or by entering an absolute co-ordinate at the prompt. E.g:
30,40
That worked with AutoCAD 13 (last version I used) and it works with an ancient version of AutoCAD LT.
Might be worth your while subscribing to some AutoCAD groups.....don't know which ones...comp.cad.autocad,alt.cad.autocad....
--

Frank


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Frank Shute wrote:

Right Direction, granted that wasn't the best wording. However I thought I was trying to help someone new get their first line down, and how to become familiar with entering distance from the keyboard.
The basics.
Far as polar settings not being correct for what line being drawn, I'll be happy to inform you on how to find the polar tracking settings. The settings can be changed after you start the line.
--
--

Mark

N.E. Ohio
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On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 00:58:12 GMT, Mark wrote:

I wasn't being critical of what you were trying to do, I was just supplying the original poster with some further info which might be useful to him & my comments about subscribing to a newsgroup were directed at him also.

Do you mean snap angle?
sn r
on my (archaic) version of LT.
--

Frank


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I use relative coordinates so that as stretch a line the length is displayed. I also use the orthogonal line feature all the time.
If I want to measure nonorthogonal lengths, I use polar coordinates.
There are many ways to do the same thing.
--

FF

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Bing! Libraries are how you save time in CAD.

Scale is pretty much a useless concept in CAD. Suppose you draw a 2 x 4 at half scale. For every CAD program I have used if you then go and use the autodimension feature the dimensions will be labeled 0.75" and 1.75" NOT 1.5" and 3.5". So draw the project in full scale, 1:1 then your dimensions will be OK and you can even measure as you go by using 'relative coordinates'. With relative coordinates every time you drop a point that point becomes your new origin and as you draw a line from that point somewhere on your screen there will be a display of how long the line is so that you can drop the end to where you want it.
--

FF

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It seems like a pain but go through the Turbocad tutorial. You will learn more than you realize. The urge to go back to paper is normal. When people ask me how long it takes to get fairly proficient with cad, I tell them 40 hours. That is usually about how much it takes before the urge to go back to paper is overcome. On the IMSI website, they have a Turbocad user forum. You might want to go there with specific questions. http://www.imsisoft.com/faminfo.asp?fam=1

to
then
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First off, have you had any formal drafting instruction? I have used probably a dozen different versions and brands of CAD in the last 18 years. I had formal drafting training in school and was glad I did when I began using CAD programs. For me the CAD programs were intuitive as I knew what to do and what I needed to look for in the programs to draw. If you are only going to do a few drawings, do them with a pencil and paper. If you are going to use a CAD program often, I would advise getting a drafting book and learn the basics so that you will know what tools to use and how to use them for any specific CAD program.
Anyway, for most people CAD has a steep learning curve unless they have had formal drafting instruction.
Learning CAD is kinda like learning to ride a motorcycle, its relatively easy if you already know how to ride a bicycle.
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yes. its good to see someone say this. There are far to many people that think all they have to do is learn a program and they are a drafter. It doesn't work that way.

years.
book
use
had
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wrote:

Yes, yes, yes! The new guys that are hired all have cad training at school, but don't seem to "get it" for actually making a drawing. Some are good, but many aren't.
BTW, I've been at this for over 25 years.
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On Fri, 07 Nov 2003 16:22:12 -0600, Lazarus Long

I studied mechanical drawing in the early seventies.
Just went to grab my old text book off the shelf:
Mechanical Drawing, French and Svensen.
The earliest copyright date on this text is 1919, so I figure a lot of guys have gone to school on this one.
Ya know, I finally had myself set up with a good board, lotsa templates, nice drawing tools, and a comfortable stool - and then along came CAD...
I still clamp the articulated arm onto some ply or MDF once in a while to draw full size.
Anybody still have the "French Curve" that was an outline of a reclining woman?
(still got mine)
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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wrote:> Anybody still have the "French Curve" that was an outline of a

What's a french curve grandpa?
S. (who scoffed at the idea of multiple pencils (F, HB, 7H, etc) and could draft an entire house with a single 2H pencil)
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Tom Watson wrote:

About 10 different sizes and an old wooden triangular architect's scale.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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wrote:

Yeah but do you have a "French Curve" that looks like the one I just posted on ABPW-ABPF?
(tom - who used to use the boxwood scales but switched to a metal one 'cause he was always nicking up the corners of the wooden ones and even though he was taught better than to use the scale as a straightedge he never really got used to the idear real good so it was important to have an un-nicked edge ta run the damned pencil on)
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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Tom Watson wrote:

No! ;-( -- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Who ever taught you to run your pencil on a scale? A scale is for mearsuing. A Mayline( or T-square) and triangle are for drafting. You NEVER draw on your scale.
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Ahhh, must be the difference between Architectural and Mechanical drafting. All we ever used were Maylines. Those wackjobs in Mechanical had those things that didn't draw horizontal.
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Surely brings back good memories although I didn't see them as such at that time.
On Sun, 09 Nov 2003 16:08:11 GMT, "PM6564"

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Congratulations. You have just made the stupidest statement I have read today.

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CW wrote:

Being from the Cleveland area I found it slightly humorous.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
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Now that I look at it again (when I'm awake), I agree with you. My bad.

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