buying used table saw

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I'm considering buying a used cabinet TS off Craig's List or whatever.
Aside from the obvious:     Overall condition, fit and finish     Table flatness and condition     Cranks, pulleys, &tc., smooth tilt and blade adjustment     motor and wiring     arbor run-out     bearings
What else should I look for?
Thanks a heap, -Zz     
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I would look for Saw Stop capabilities.. :-) Flame wars begin.
On 10/16/2012 5:54 PM, Zz Yzx wrote:

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On 10/16/2012 4:54 PM, Zz Yzx wrote:

...
Well, I'd start w/ make/model/electrics...
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When you go to inspect it, bring some boards and do some specific cuts and such. Not only see how it works, but feel how it works.
Sonny
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I'd also take a square with you, preferable a small one ~ 4" maybe. Do a visual check of the trunnion and then 90° squareness of the blade with it almost down and then all the way up to see if it changes. That's often a good indication of trunnion problems too.
Question: How much is being asked for the saw and how much are you willing to spend. There's successive degrees of table saw categories dependent on what you're willing to spend.
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Zz Yzx wrote:

Price
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On Tue, 16 Oct 2012 14:54:30 -0700, Zz Yzx wrote:

Broken trunnion
basilisk
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Zz Yzx wrote:

Horse power
220v capability
Availability of parts
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On Tuesday, October 16, 2012 4:54:14 PM UTC-5, Zz Yzx wrote:

I'd start with thinking about what saw I'd want if I were buying new, then look for that model in the pre-owned market. In addition to CL, you might want to watch IRS auctions in the event there is one close to you. They seem to specialize in surplus woodworking equipment.
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Gramp's shop wrote:

You say "or whatever", but if you are looking for a cabinet saw (~500 pounds), and don't have a truck with a lift gate, LOCATION counts for a lot.
An important feature I didn't see in your list is a "quality fence". Good luck (I'm still in search of a TS myself)! Grizzly G690 is on my list, but i wouldn't mind seeing a Delta UnisawStop (my term) show up in the marketplace.
Bill

look for that model in the pre-owned market. In addition to CL, you might want to watch IRS auctions in the event there is one close to you. They seem to specialize in surplus woodworking equipment.

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look for that model in the pre-owned market. In addition to CL, you might want to watch IRS auctions in the event there is one close to you. They seem to specialize in surplus woodworking equipment.

I'm pretty sure it was Swingman but he had the best idea I've seen if you have no alternatives. He hired a flatbed tow truck it went very well.
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On Wed, 17 Oct 2012 16:54:13 -0700, Mike M

look for that model in the pre-owned market. In addition to CL, you might want to watch IRS auctions in the event there is one close to you. They seem to specialize in surplus woodworking equipment.

I assume you know how to negotiate and let them use standby time to reduce the cost.
Mike M
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Mike M wrote:

How does that work ("standby time")?
Bill
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They have truck's ready to respond to emergencies. You get them to do your job as filler work to help cover overhead. Don't expect them to commit to hours of work without adequate compensation. Also you might approach a few drivers and see if they are open to under the table jobs.
Mike M
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On 10/17/2012 6:54 PM, Mike M wrote:

Have a good friend - he is younger and a big fella, who puts his Unisaw in the back of his pickup and takes and sets it up on site for finish work alone. Yes, they're heavy, but do tip upside down without ever requiring picking up the whole thing. They are much more stable upside down - no longer top heavy. He does have a short Biesmeyer on it.
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I'd think that would be *very* hard on the cast iron top. I have to move mine the last 100' (garage to basement) in our move from AL to GA, soon. I've been told by everyone to be careful of the top.
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On 10/21/2012 6:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Tipped over flat on an old army blanket is probably a whole lot better than any other method.
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That's not going to work. Bumpy yard with a decent hill (down, fortunately). I'll rent a U-Haul to get it to the back door. With some judicious use of 2x10s it should go on its own wheels. I may have to use some plywood sheets to get it to go over the carpeting (dumb idea in a basement).
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On Oct 21, 6:40 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Break the saw down. Smaller pieces are easier to handle without damage. Wings and table are probably going to need to be reset, anyway.
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...

...
What do you mean by hard on a cast iron top? Breakage? Scratching? What. I don't think I've ever seen a TS with a cast iron top - how common are they?
Personally, I'd just put a heavy blanket down, turn the saw over, and set it on the blanket upside down. A furniture blanket would be best, but anything for padding shoulc work. Otherwise, load it uprght and simply tie it in place properly and voilA! No problem. If you do turn a saw upside down, clean out the sawdust and be sure any motor mounts won't twist or otherwise be damaged from the vibrations. If the motor is external, it's best to simply remove it and carry it separated from the TS.
HTH,
Twayne`
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