Butcher block countertop ideas.

Stopped by HD yesterday for an estimate on some butcher block countertop. Yikes. They quoted me ~$300 for a 9' laminated piece, w/ backsplash & dripedge. I believe it was from Vanguard???
I was told the solid variety would be around $800.
So, I'm considering building one myself.
I was thinking about mixing two species of lighter colored woods, white oak & maple possiblly?
Start with 6/4 stock, cut into 1" strips, alternate strips, glue & clear coat.
Since food contact is obvious, what type(s) of glue & clear finish is recommended? Is glue and clamping sufficient? I have some Zinsser Bulls Eye Seal Coat sanding sealer, can I start with this?
Would a solid (single species) backsplash
Any other suggestions are welcome, ThankX Ron
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oak
Did some more research (Googling..) and found a product called 'Salad Bowl Finish' from General Finishes. Non-toxic (when dry) and approved for food contact.

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Actually, all drying finishes are safe for food contact when dry. If you plan to do any cutting on your countertop, then a film finish like the "Salad Bowl Finish" will get damaged and be a lot of work to repair. Mineral oil or a mineral oil and beeswax mixture would be a better choice, since you can wipe more on when needed. I also like to use unprocessed walnut oil on wooden eating implements such as bowls and spoons. If you always use a cutting board, the Salad Bowl Finish is ok.
David
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On 11 Jan 2004 12:33:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comkey (J Pagona aka Y.B.) wrote:

Not all of them. I certainly wouldn't trust lead-dried linseed.
When talking about "food safe", then it also matters what the food is. Some foods (rhubarb, citrus fruit, salt or vinegar) can be much more active on a surface than others. I can think of plenty of finishes that I'd trust when full of plain lettuce, but not with a dressed salad.
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 03:07:06 +0000, Ron wrote:

Years ago I made one by gluing 1x2 maple and then taking the piece to a local shop where it was sanded in their wide belt sander. Turned out great. I never have had any problem with any separation.
I kept mine looking good with an occasional application of mineral oil, although I always wondered whether this would really be necessary given the maple being not so porous. I certainly wouldn't put any solvent based sealer on it.
If I were to make it again, I might get classy and put in some contrasting wood strips, perhaps of walnut or cherry. Might make my cooking turn out classy as well.
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Ron,
A 9' piece of 24" wide maple butcherblock should not be anywhere near $800. I stopped in to the new Woodcraft near me a couple days ago, and they had 24 x 84 workbench tops, laminated/finger jointed maple, on sale for (IIRC) about $379. It will be a lot of work to make your own, and unless you have ready access to a *lot* of clamps, a way to surface the block when it's glued up, and the materials for cheap, it won't be worth it. I know with a 9' length, I'd be needing 9'+ lengths of maple as well, because I wouldn't want end grain butt joints in the middle of the countertop.
I wouldn't recommend oak, unless it's white oak, and that may not go too well visually with the maple.
Try restaurant supply places, as well as Grizzly. I believe they sell maple butcherblock.
Jon E

oak
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Strength of an end grain but joint in a row of butcher block is not an issue, as long as the joint is lapped sufficiently on both sides with a solid piece of wood. The trick is to keep all of the joints at least 6" apart in adjoining rows.
David
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I bought the maple for an 80"x25"x1.5" from Croffwoodmills.com for about $175 shipped. I bought a finished 72x30 workbench top from Grainger for $200. I like the one I made better than the one I bought but that may just be me ;-)
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<snip>
You may want to look for a Lumber Liquidators near you. They sell butcher block counter top more reasonably than that.
Next question: How soon do you need it done? Making your own will take you a while. Not every one who uses MY kitchen is willing/able to wait for me to 'do it up pretty'.
Patriarch, blessed with a very patient wife in MANY regards.
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