Building Stairs


Have done a lot of reading and searching on the internet and am still confused and unsure of how many steps to make on the stair risers on an outside deck. Am turning to this knowledgable group for your recommendations. One set of stairs will have a total rise of 32" and the other 34". What would you recommend for a rise and run for each set.
Vic
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There are formulas for determining rise and run. First step though. is to make them both the same height. Take another look as see if you can re-grade, pour a larger pad, fill in, dig out, or whatever has to be done to make them both the same height and layout. You'd want three steps of 8" to get the 32" platform. I'm not sure of hte run, but it is probably going to be about 9"+ You may even be able to buy pre-cut stringers at the lumber yard.
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 08:21:13 -0400, the opaque snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca spake:

Here's a site which might help, Victor:
http://www.bestdecksite.com/introStairsPg1.htm I believe the info you need is there without registering.
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 08:21:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wrote:

This might give you some direction: http://outdoor-living.hardwarestore.com/learning/a-guide-to-building-outdoor-stairs.aspx
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 08:21:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wrote:

Code at my location requires 8" or less rise and run must be over 9". Both figures can vary + or- 1/8". You can change the rise (on a split set of stairs) as long as you have a landing where they break. Check your local codes.
With that in mind, lets say you want the fewest steps. On the 32" rise you can go 4 each 8" rises. On the 34" rise you need 5 rises anyway which would be a hair under 6 13/16" If you wanted to match them and go with 5 rises on each set the 32" rise would be 5 rises at a hair over 6 3/8". I'd go with 5 rises on each set since I think 8" rises are too much. That might just be because I'm getting old.
10" runs are pretty common and with the 5 rises above the steps should feel comfortable. If you have 2x12 tread material that measures 11 1/4" you can cut the run 10 1/4" and not have to rip your tread material. Run length (and the number of rises) might be more critical if you have anything in the way where the steps land or if you have to hit an existing pad.
Mike O.
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I used to take steps two at a time, but I've not done that in the past 20 years or so.
Probably not a big deal on a short stair, but I can be on a higher stair. We have two sets of stairs at work going to the same level, about 11 feet high. One set of stairs has an 8" rise, the other has a 7 1/4" rise. I'm not sure of the run. I find it harder to go up the shorter rise and longer run. I'm not really sure why, but it could be that the leg is reaching a bit further out instead of up? I never paid a lot of attention to the difference as I usually use the back stairs as it is right outside my office door, but a few weeks ago the bank courier lamented that the front steps are the toughest he has to climb every day.
Now you have me curious and I'll have to measure the run. Could be it is enough to throw off the "rhythm" going up that particular staircase.
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wrote:

Maybe it's a matter of perception and you may be right that the run is more bothersome. Sometimes we will work in a house where the framers had to cram the stairs in, to hit a landing or something. Steep rises and short runs always give me the feeling that I need to hurry up the stairs. I tend to saunter more than I hurry. ;-)
Mike O.
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