Bolt, 10-24


10-24 is a size smaller than 1/4 inch with 24 threads per inch. There are sizes such as 8, 6, 4. To determine the actual bolt diameter you might refer to a bolt size chart.
I just did a search on "Bolt Size Chart" and there are plenty that will answer your question.
Don Dando
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On Mon, 07 Aug 2006 00:19:47 GMT, "Don Dando"

<G>.
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shank with 24 threads per inch. Jim

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wrote:

But not everybody lives in America and lives by their rules. <g>
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wrote:

Well having grown up around BSW/BSW/UNC/UNF/BA *and* Metric I for one knew the 24 was the tpi but I didn't have a clue and still don't as to what the 10 means.
From what you say It's clearly not 10/64" or 10/32" or 10/16" 10/8" or 10/4"
10 gauge(swg) is about 3.2mm or just over 1/8" so its not that either 10 gauge (awg) is 0.1019" so its not that, nor is it 10 gauge (shotgun) as that is 0.777 inches
And some say metric is complicated?
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On Wed, 09 Aug 2006 22:49:31 +0100, Martin Evans

10 is just another arbitrary number someone picked out for the diameter. It probably starts at 0 or maybe even 00. I know model trains use a lot of #2-56.. #4-40 is pretty common as the size in a D shell connector retaining screw and orher small machine screws. #6-32, 8-32 and 10-32 are the most commonly used small machine screws. 10-24 is more of a "stove bolt" kind of thing with a course thread used in places where fine tolerances are not required and where it may be dirty when you install it. If you had a jar of 4-40s. 6-32, 8-32, 10-32 and 10-24 it would be about all you would need until you get up into "bolt" sizes like the 1/4"x20 and up.
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Martin Evans wrote:

standardization that Britain did. The challenge was taken up by William Sellers, scion of an eminent family of American "mechanicians," whose grandfather had made the plates with which the Continental Congress printed its currrency. In 1864, a committee of the Franklin Institute recommended the adoption of Seller's system of screw threads. The thread form became known as the "Franklin thread," or, more commonly "Seller's thread," and later as the "United States Standard Thread." It became the basis of the French standard thread, and then of the Systme International thread. In May 1924 it was designated the "American Standard Thread." In 1907 the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) defined two series that used Seller's thread, numbering the sizes by gage numbers from 0 to 30. In the series the major diameter started at 0.060 and increased by 0.013 inch with each size from 0 to 10, and by 0.026 inch between gages above #10. Shamelessly cribbed from www.sizes.com
So number 10 is 0.060" + 10 x 0.013" or 0.190", about 3/16" ie. 0.1875".
Interestingly enough, modern screw charts show #12 as 0.216 and #14 as 0.242 which means that at some point after 1907 the 0.026" increment was dropped and 0.013" used above #10 too: #10--0.190, #11--0.203, #12--0.216, #13--0.229, #14--0.242
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