Bizarre request - how would you do it?

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W Canaday (in snipped-for-privacy@replyonlist.com) said:
| We'll let the test, itself, provide the sealing, eh? ;-)
I like the way you think. :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Huh? You handled it perfectly fine by ignoring it, I'd say.
Let's assume, for the sake of absurd argument, that this heats up the interior cavity to 300C. That's twice atmospheric temperature, so by the ideal gas law it's going to be at twice atmospheric pressure. A six inch square face is 36 inches square, times 15 psi, is about 500 pounds. Yeah, that's a fair bit, but the box should certainly handle. Besides which, if it does yield a little, it will thereby immediately develop a leak and relieve the pressure, preventing failure.
This is completely aside from the fact that heating the interior up to 300C means that the sensors inside are toast and the box has failed anyway regardless of whether it remains structurally sound.
And it's also completely aside from the fact that I would be very surprised if the back side of three inches of oak would even get _warm_ after only five minutes. There's a reason the Chinese use the stuff for heat shields on some of their space capsules....
- Brooks
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The "bmoses-nospam" address is valid; no unmunging needed.

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All sounds like a great ideas.
Mr Doveys design in white oak. Errm what would you use to glue the the two halves together with?
Without ruining a good design I was also thinking of a peg system. Using 1x1 square pegs from corner to corner going through the crenallations on two sides to hold it together.
Nice idea about the fire retardent paint. Two things, No foreign materials and no fire, just intense heat.
TR
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TrailRat wrote:

I presume he changes his tests. Even if it's only because each year he thinks of something new and interesting to try, or discovered last year that one of the tests didn't work out like he'd hoped.

Ah! I was right about questioning whether the real objective was to have the strongest box! (Well, sorta.) Sounds like to me that the _real_ objective of this experiment is to produce interesting results to describe, and for the students to get some experience in how different materials respond to various damaging things.
Just build something tough. Have fun. :)
And, for extra fun, I'd suggest giving the engineering student a list of the suggestions and possibilities, and have them make all the final decisions about how to build it.
- Brooks
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Wood Butcher wrote: <snip>

...who then flunk out of the liberal arts when asked to learn a few languages, or Plato's theory of forms, or what have you...then they turn to what, Wood Butchering?
Smirking at a good jab, H
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I'd be inclined to use laminated 3/8" white oak with epoxy for glue. Leave a void that meets the minimum cavity requirements and alternate the grain direction. White oak is tough to crush...
John
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There are probably more design parameters than you have been given. I would expect weight to factor into the scoring in a negative way (weight counts against you). When I was in engineering school, lo these many years ago, we had a contest to design a carrier that would deliver a grade A medium hen's egg safely to the ground from a free fall of 30 feet. Weight of the container was multiplied by time spent falling with the lowest score winning (if the egg survived). The heavy containers and the parachutes didn't score very well.
DonkeyHody "We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it - and stop there; lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove-lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove-lid again---and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore." - Mark Twain
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I had to do this too. The winning design (not mine) was a rocket shaped aluminum tube with holes in the body. Rings of larger holes near the tail progressed to rings of ever smaller holes near the nose. The tube was filled with shaving cream and the egg inserted near the tail. When it hit the ground the obvious happened and the egg survived perfectly. The real stroke of genius was the realization that there was no specification (or limit) on the initial velocity. This allowed launching the tube via bungee cord launch mechanism and reduced the free fall time to less than what gravity alone would produce.
Art

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TrailRat wrote:

Then each box will undergo only one test, right?
The variable to be measured is the material. All other factors should be held constant. Therefore, build four boxes of different materials but the same dimensions.
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I would start with a 4x8 sheet of 3/8" plywood. I'd then cut it into 32 squares of equal size (slightly less than 1' squares). You won't use one of the squares.
I would take a router or scroll saw and cut 8" circles out of the center of 21 of the squares.
Using resorcinol glue, create a laminate of 5 full size squares and 21 hollow squares. Create a second laminate of 5 full size squares. You now have a box with an 8" diameter x 7 7/8" tall cylinder in it. Put the equipment in the cylinder and glue the lid on the box. You've now got a slightly less than 1' cube of laminated wood. To remove the equipment cut the top 5 layers off the box.
IMHO, that design should be waterproof, insulated, and able to support the weight of a car.
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