Bike wheel for a bandsaw..

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That is correct. Inca didn't think like other people on anything. I quite liked their reasoning on a lot of issues (tilting table on a TS for instance is kinda nice for small furniture parts). T
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I've seen plywood used. Laminate 2 pieces of 3/4" and install the hub. Cut out the wheel with a router on a trammel arm. True to the last hair of a thousandth of an inch with a scraper or file held against the wheel while turning it (by hand) after installing the wheel in the frame. Glue on a tire, and she's ready to go.
Balanced wheels turn smoother. Install nuts and bolts where needed to add weight and reinforce the lamination.
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On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 00:17:16 -0700, Father Haskell wrote:

Dial-gauge true, or is that pointless with wood? (I expect so)

How much do tyres stretch - i.e. do I make it 12" diameter exactly for a 12" tyre, or slightly under, or what?

Should be simple enough... although it seems like it would be easier to balance it by drilling holes or adding screws...
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Yes, however a good quality bike wheel, well built on a decent hub, will cost more than a bandsaw wheel. A junkyard bike wheel, with poor quality spokes and no tension, won't do it.
If you really care, go over to rec.bikes.tech and ask Jobst Brandt, the guy who wrote the book (literally) on bike wheel theory. If you just want to tweak up a wheel to run true, go to the late, great Sheldon Brown's website and read the step-by-step instructions.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Read and understand the book first, or risk humiliation. <G>

That was a shame... A loss far too early.
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Why not look at Grainger or McMaster Carr?
They have a bunch of varied size rigid pulley type wheels for a fraction of what you are looking at doing.
I don't think a bike wheel will hold the tension you need to run a bandsaw blade true.
wrote:

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On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 22:57:07 +0000, Jay R wrote:

I would, but I'm in the UK. And we don't seem to have places that sell general engineering stuff to the public (or for sane prices)..
Unless anybody knows different? (I'm near Gloucester if that helps)

Well I know a 12" kids bike wheel can hold my weight and I'm 200lbs, so it's in the ballpark for 1/4" blades. As others have said though, the bearings might not last too long...
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No math to prove myself right or wrong, but it seems that putting weight on a wheel and tire mounted on a bike is not the same force/pressure as putting a steel band around 1/2 of it and tightening it until the blade "pings"?
Still sort of downward force, I guess, but different tension/angles?
Can you tell that I failed math?
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 10:43:44 -0700, mac davis wrote:

Well as far as I can see, the force at any particular point should be towards the centre - otherwise the blade wouldn't be tightly wrapped onto the wheel...
...and bike wheels are designed to handle the full load (say 200lbs) on *one* point in contact with the ground - so having the same load spread over half the wheel ought to be better.
I think.
:-)
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On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 10:43:44 -0700, mac davis

Yes, it's quite different. The axle (fixed) on a bandsaw wheel is cantilevered and "overhung", that on a bike is supported from both sides by the fork. This also means that a bike's load-bearing axle is particularly short - the bearings are mounted at the outer ends of the axle. Where they're mounted away from this, towards the middle of the axles (old 7-speed screw-on rear blocks) the axles started to break. Later designs (Shimano cassettes) moved the bearings back out again and had reliable axles again.
A rare exception to this would be a Mike Burrows (e.g. Adam Hart-Davies') or a Canondale "Lefty" with a single-sided fork and an overhung front axle.
As far as the _wheel_ goes though, bandsaw tensions aren't a problem for a decent bike wheel. The impact loading is also _much_ reduced.
A workshop I'm vaguely associated with has an old Victorian multi-tool machine that I restored - planer (removed), horizontal borer and bandsaw. The bandsaw wheels were rolled iron hoops (18" - 20" ish AFAIR) on cast iron hubs. As the original spokes looked dubious, we replaced these with bike-spoke tech, all according to Jobst's book. Works fine.
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