best wood for tiller

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Wed, Jul 12, 2006, 11:21am snipped-for-privacy@norealbox.com (Renata) Cost effective example. <snip> Not sure where you got "free".
Cost effectives:
Rough trim plywood, laminate, final shape. Titebond II should work fine as it won't be immersed in water. If it's "scrap" plywood, cost is nil. Even if you buy some it won't cost much. I frequently laminate plywood for different projects - jigs, etc. Sometime you can even get free "scraps".
Pallet wood. I mentioned this before. Usually no telling what type of wood, but you can get it free. If yer worried about it not lasting, rough out a couple more. Personally, I think it'll probably last as long as anything else. I used some for my banjo neck, only problem is it's so hard a rasp will hardly touch it, so it's taking a LOT of work to final shape. But now I've got a hand power planer. Hehehe
There's more examples, but I'd have to think, and I don't feel like thinking.
There is no such thing as "scrap" plywood, just smaller and smaller pieces. If you can't figure out any other use for it you can always use it for a backer piece in drilling holes.
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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Agree with the previous posts re. laminated white ash for a sailboat tiller; An inexpensive source of the wood is in a solid ash hockey stick, if you can find one or more of them.
Just cut off the blade, then rip the stick into thin strips on your table saw, and lay up a laminated tiller with waterproof glue, either in a simple straight length, or in a curved jig according to the plans you have on hand.
The manufacturing process has apparently changed over the years, and many of the sticks are now made with a combination of lesser hardwoods, with only the blade composed of white ash. You'll have to have a good eye for finding the Real McCoy in newly-produced versions, or look for some vintage hockey sticks at a yard sale, secondhand thrift store, etc. Best regards, Sandpebble .....................................................................................................................
How to buy a field hockey stick

sticks have a toe with a rounded edge that faces the right and a flat, hitting surface that faces the left. To be able to hit the other direction with the flat face you have to turn the stick 180 degrees.
2.Look into sticks made from different materials. The best are made from ash or mulberry wood.
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White Ash, from Woodzone.com Botanical Name: Fraxinus, americana Other Names: American White Ash, Canadian White Ash Natural Characteristics:Strong and very shock-resistant Color: Light brown heartwood with white sapwoood Uses: Baseball bats, pool cues, canoe paddles, tool handles, veneer, boat building. Comments: White ash has been called the all-American leisure wood because of the large number of uses it has in sports and recreation equipment.
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snipped-for-privacy@mybluelight.com wrote:
> Agree with the previous posts re. laminated white ash for a sailboat > tiller; > An inexpensive source of the wood is in a solid ash hockey stick, if > you > can find one or more of them.
Less 60 miles from here is a company building hockey stocks from carbon fiber and epoxy.
Last I heard has at least an 18 month backlog.
Ain't modern science wonderful.
Lew
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