Best way to drill a 1" hole through 2" thick maple?

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On 9/4/2014 2:57 PM, Leon wrote:

Yeah, and you are the one who hooked/turned me on them ... by giving me one.
Thanks again! :)
- eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net https://www.google.com/+eWoodShop https://plus.google.com/+KarlCaillouet/posts http://www.custommade.com/by/ewoodshop/ KarlCaillouet@ (the obvious)
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On 9/4/2014 3:14 PM, Swingman wrote:

LOL, did you buy more? I was at Cornerstone hardware several months ago and loaded up on a bunch of them from their clearance table.
I am real picky on what I use them on.
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I've bought a number of them from Woodcraft but they no longer carry them. :-(
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On 9/4/2014 7:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Might be why he did not mention Woodcraft. ;~)
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On Sat, 6 Sep 2014 02:10:20 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@rahul.net (Edward A. Falk) wrote:

For drill bits, I'm of the school of "buy a cheap set and replace them as needed with good ones". Some will never be used. Router bits are the opposite, IMO. Buy really good ones, as they're needed. The sets always include some that I'll never use. Drill bits are a lot cheaper than router bit, too.

I have an use them but I'm always afraid of burning them, so only use them when needed.
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"Edward A. Falk" wrote:

No.
A single pass as fast as possible to minimize heat build up.
Lew
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On 9/5/14, 9:17 PM, Edward A. Falk wrote:

... or a drill press.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 9/5/14, 9:18 PM, Edward A. Falk wrote:

No. My original post.....
"Forstner bit, for sure. If you're using a drill press and can clamp the stock, drill a 3/4 or 7/8 hole first, then drill the finished 1' hole. One thing that makes sloppy holes in hardwoods is the release of tension in the wood as it's being cut. This can cause burning and an oblong hole after the wood inside the hole has released and warped/swelled a bit.
Drilling the smaller hole first allows the burning to happen on the smaller, unused hole. When you go to cut the finished hole, the chips have an escape route and there will be less friction. Also, if you're *really* concerned with the perfect hole, let the wood sit overnight after drilling the smaller hole to allow the freshly cut outside surface (inside the hole) to acclimate. Cut the finish hole after that and it will be perfect."
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I use them for everything. When they get dull a dremmel tool with a cutoff wheel sharpens the larger sizes very nicely. Triangle files of different sizes for the small ones and not too dull larger ones.
--
Jim in NC


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True, that works great and I have been forced to do that many times, but why, when you don't have to.
The original talk was about drilling a smaller hole with a forstner, then opening it up to the final size with the final forstner.
When using a twist bit, the wood is compressed outwards, a certain small amount. Drilling undersized and then going to the final size is a viable strategy. The wood is cut across the width of the hole, and forced upwards along the flutes, which both contribute to the compression.
But a forstner cuts the outer edge of the hole while there is still wood on both sides of the cut, so the wood is not compressed to either side of the cut. The inside of the hole is then removed, and the chips brought out through generous relief openings in the bit. There is no compression of the hole. So why drill the same hole two times? I don't know why you would do it on purpose.
--
Jim in NC


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On 9/6/2014 5:23 AM, Morgans wrote:

Forstner bits remove a lot of material and typically require more effort from you to feed the bit. If the final size forstner is not having to remove all of the material at once it is easier to feed.
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On 9/6/14, 5:23 AM, Morgans wrote:

I think it was my original reply that brought up drilling a smaller hole, then the finished hole. It wasn't for compression of the waste, it was for stress relief in the wood, and for the slight warping of the wood after being cut. Similar to when people will turn bowls on a lathe from non-segmented stock. It is common practice to turn the bowl down to a rough size, bigger than the finish size, then let the rough bowl warp from the stress relief and relative humidity change, then turn it to the finish size and shape.
I brought up the technique for anyone would need a perfect hole, not necessarily for the OPs intended purpose. This is not something that needs done for 99% of what we do as woodworkers, but if you're doing a project where a large hole needs to stay round, say for some sort of jig or other thing in which a dowel will be inserted and removed from a hole, it can really help keep the hole truly round.
Try it sometime. Cut a 2" hole in a large piece of wood, then measure it with accurate digital calipers. Take it inside the house overnight or for a few days. Measure it again and in many cases it will be slightly oblong.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"Edward A. Falk" wrote in message

On mine, 2 1/4" maple, I used a 1/2" drive drill motor and a sharp Forstner bit, and the holes all came out just fine. Here are some tips:
As someone else has said, back it up with a clamped piece of scrap or it will blow out the underside. A contrasting wood color will tell you right away when you're through.
When you're driving the bit by hand, it's almost impossible not to rock the bit off vertical as the hole gets deeper; set up a couple squares on the bench top at 90 degrees to each other, and have a helper sight the verticals in both planes from time to time to keep you on track.
The rim of a Forstner bit heats up quickly, and can get damned hot, so drive the bit a half-inch or so, then back it out of the hole still spinning to let it cool off, then peck another half-inch or so, and so on until you're through. Or just set it down once in a while to let it cool off. The general rule on Forstners is to drill with a good speed of advance into the hole, so as to get through without heating the tool too much, but I defy you to horse a 1" Forstner through hard maple as fast as you'd need to go.
If your Forstner bit is dull, you're doomed.
Tom
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Can't say I've really experienced that problem with Forstner bits - usually once the body of the bit is completely in the wood, it tracks true without any particular effort.
What is handy, when using a Forstner in a hand drill instead of a drill press, is to use the drill press to drill a hole thru a block of scrap, and clamp that to the workpiece, to guide the bit getting started.
John
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On Tuesday, September 2, 2014 4:04:17 PM UTC-4, Edward A. Falk wrote:

Hole saw. Clear the sawdust out frequently, it's just as fast as an auger and similarly accurate.
Wouldn't use a Forstner unless it was a stopped hole, or some precision requirement on diameter (as, for doweling).
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Posted on 09/02/14
"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

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wrote:

I'd use the forsner if I had it and didn't have a hole saw. I'd use the hole saw if I had it and didn't have a forstner. I'd use a 3/32 pilot drill and an auger or spade - coming in from the back a short distance first, then turning the work over and finishing from the front. A speedbore spade would be my choi auger - but the drill press would not be optional.
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I drilled the 3/4" dog holes in my 2+" thick bench top with a big plunge router and appropriate bit with 1/2" shank. The big 3 hp Porter Cable plunge router.
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On Mon, 8 Sep 2014 11:45:28 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Basically, you use what you've got. If you have more than one option, you use the best you have. If you have no options, you buy what you will get the most use out of or what you otherwise would have a hard time getting permission from SWMBO to buy!!!!
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Maybe I missed this in all the previous replies. How about an ol' fashioned human powered brace and bit? No burning up motors. Real time error correction, speed control, and you can still listen to your shop music without an electrically powered tool buzzing away. :)
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