Best thing to use...

I am not sure what the best thing to use is when it comes to making an entertainment centre. I just need a name of the best product available (in Canada) to get the job done (attaching two pieces of wood together). I am new to this hobby, and am wanting to start with something along these lines.
Thank you,
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In article <DmTMc.1218449$Ar.170048
says...

Hello David
Joining two piece of wood is called, well, It's called joining or jointing. Other then milling the wood it is the most basic and important thing you have to do in woodworking.
As such the means and methods to join to pieces of wood together are legion and extremely varied. I respectfully suggest, due to the nature of the question, that you would be better served by a trip to the local library or book store followed by some considerable bit of time studying the information that one can find on woodworking in such places.
Presumably, after that is accomplished, you will be able to come back and not only ask intelligent questions but will also have some base of knowledge that will allow you to understand the answers.
It isn't rocket science but, then again, it isn't paint by numbers either and will require you extend yourself a bit if you wish to successfully take up the avocation. This is especially true if you wish to become a woodworker that still has five whole fingers per hand.
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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I was thinking of using a mortise and tenon joint. I was just wondering what the best type of adhesive would be. I've seen people use different types of epoxy, and glues, as I watch many of the different shows on HGTV (ie: Jon Eakes, Home Again, and the New Yankee Workshop).
I will take your advice and go to the public library anyways. I am a grade 10 student, and am taking shop class, so my skills are fine.
Thanks for your (and everyone else's) responses, David Liles
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David Liles wrote:

For ordinary indoor use the "white" glues (aka "PVA" or "aliphatic resin") are quite satisfactory with mortise and tenon joints.

--
--John
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 21:40:42 GMT, "David Liles"

Well David, Welcome to rec.woodworking. as you can see, there are plenty of us here who would like to jabber on about woodworking. if possible, stick around. don't mind the trolls, just don't feed them. feel free to ask questions as you go along- I'm sure you'll get some good answers along with the usual smartass comments....
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I find Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking books 1&2 bound together an excellent reference tome.
On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 21:40:42 GMT, "David Liles"

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In article <uNVMc.1220350$Ar.600696
says...

Hi David
A mortice and tenon joint is one option as is dado's and biscuits, but, depending on where in the construction you are going to use it and what the unit is to be made out of, it may not be the best choice. Dado's or biscuits would be my choice for mounting shelves and would probably be a good way to go if all you want is a basic set of shelves. Then there is the rabbet joint for the back of the unit.
Then there is the question of whether you are going to use a face frame design or no. The best joints there and attaching it to the carcass.
Of course if you want drawers of doors there is a bunch of new concepts to deal with.
There is also the issues of stock selection which includes such things as wood moment (also important in selecting a joint) moisture content, and acclimation.
Finally there are the correct tools required to do the job and we won't even get into finishing right now.
All I can really tell you at the moment is that good old every day yellow glue is probably your best bet for indoor construction.
I know that the woodworking shows make it look easy and turn out nice looking pieces in a half hour but, unfortunately for novice woodworkers, they pretty much ignore the underlying basic knowledge and skills base that lets them take a few boards and turn them into a piece of furniture.
I'm not trying to discourage you here. What I am trying is to help you avoid a lot of frustration, disappointment, and needless expenditures. There is a lot of unmentioned things that go on behind the scenes of those woodworking shows but the knowledge isn't hard to get or the skills beyond the scope of just about anyone if they are willing to learn and practice rather then expecting a work of art without right out of the box without doing so.
Best of luck
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David Liles wrote:

This is kind of like asking "how high is up".
There is no "best product available for attaching two pieces of wood together". What's best depends on the design of the joint, the type of wood, the intended exposure, the loads to be applied, and numerous other factors. For some applications nails work fine. For others wood or drywall screws are more satisfactory. For others machine screws with nuts. For others various varieties of "white" (aka PVA aka "aliphatic resin") glue work well. For others other varieties of glue. For others shaping the wood carefully and designing the joint carefully so that no fasteners beyond possibly some wedges are needed is the right choice. And this leaves aside the whole realm of special-purpose fasteners intended for one specific type of application.

--
--John
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David -
Well, I think that more specific information from you would assist those who would comment in providing you with responses that would better serve your needs.
Typically entertainment centers are build out of MDF or hardwood plywood, with solid wood edging, drawers and panels. Joinery is a combination of biscuits or dowels, dadoes, dovetails, glue joints, rabbets, screws, etc, depending on the subassembly.
This month's edition of Wood Magazine has plans for a "modular" entertainment center that may be both adaptable to your needs and provide more specific answers to your questions.
Hope this helps!
John Moorhead

lines.
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 18:55:31 GMT, "David Liles"

are you asking for recommendations for glue? http://tinyurl.com/4dc8b
or fasteners? http://tinyurl.com/5wqe3
or joinery? http://tinyurl.com/43qa5
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Some guys use fancy sissy looking joints and carefully fit parts together but that takes too much time. You'd never get it done in time for hockey season. Best thing I've found it nails. A 16d nail with a big head holds together anything I've build so far. Simple and cheap and only one tool need, a 20 ounce hammer..
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wrote in message

I guess if you are framing a house, yes, but for an entertainement centre, one might want a nicer finish and something that will hold together at least until the next superbowl.
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George wrote:

One would hope that the house framed in that manner would hold together until the next Superbowl and that the entertainment center experiences less severe loadings than the house in which it is located.
As for finish and the like, that's a matter of taste. Some people go for the "rough" look, especially in a college dorm where it's all gonna get busted anyway.
--
--John
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On 26 Jul 2004 06:19:28 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (George) wrote:

nice cast, Ed. looks like you got one...
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