best method to cut 3/4" aluminum tubing?

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There are aluminum-cutting blades specifically made for the table saw or circular saw. I would use one of these if I had 400 pieces to cut. If you need to save some $ remember you can use the 7 1/4" blade in your table saw instead of paying for the 10", which you don't need to cut 3/4" thick tubing. If you use the table saw (as opposed to handheld circ. saw) clean all the sawdust out of it before you cut the tubing.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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I would probably get a metal-cutting blade and put it in the miter saw. I suspect that you're starting off with longer tubing sections, which for me would be easier to deal with on the miter saw.
todd
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Circular saw with carbide blade and a homemade cutting jig to give you repeatable lengths (easily made from 2x4s and a piece of plywood)
John
wrote:

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david wrote:

I see all the posts about putting a metal cutting blade in a miter saw and going to town, and I would indeed do so as well.
Now for my "But," so to speak.
But I've always avoided putting metal cutting blades on my wood working equipment due to worrying about the detrimental effects all those metal filings may have inside the motors and on the bearing surfaces of my equipment not specifically made for metal cutting. And after 400 pieces, there's going to be a lot of metal filings. Go ahead and call me paranoid, but the only wood working tool I've used with a metal blade in it was a cheap circular saw I considered expendable. At the very least, make sure to clean your equipment up after using it to cut metal. Blowing out the equipment and its motor with air is what I'd do, but I'm sure that brings up another debate of if one jams filings further into the machine that way. Perhaps thought given to using a vacuum to suck up filings as they are cut would go a long way toward protecting your wood working equipment.
OR am I just paranoid?
Thanks, Steve
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Are you willing to pay 25 each to have them cut? If so, buy a $99 Ryobi and start cutting.
Whe done, clean it up, put back the oringial blade and sell it on eBay. (Sprinke a little sawdust for good measure) You may get the cost down to 12 1/2 each that way.

Even if you are, it doesn't; mean people aren't out to get you. ;)
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I got my Delta on sale for $88 and have seen CMT's or GMT's (something like that) for $69.
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12
Or rent a chop saw for a day. About $30.00.
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david wrote:

I bought HF's least expensive metal-cutting (horizontal) bandsaw a year ago because I found myself building more and more metal jigs and fixtures. Since then I've cut a fair amount of aluminum and brass - and the machine (and original blade) are still working like new.
I'd suggest that this is probably the appropriate tool for the job - and can either be sold or kept when your deck rails are done. (I'd be surprised if you didn't keep it.)
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wrote:

I have the jet version of that saw. the HF, jet and delta versions appear to be identical. it's a great tool, as long as you aren't looking for real accuracy. I'll second that suggestion.
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