Best method for cutting MDF

What is the best method for cutting 1/2" and 3/4" MDF?
If have a pair of Freud thin-kerf 10" blades, a 50 tooth combo in my T/S and a 60 tooth in my miter saw. Would either of these make clean cuts in the MDF?
It seems like a messy/dusty material to cut, is this true?
Also, should the edges be treated after cutting? The finished project, MDF included, will be painted
Thankx once again, Ron
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On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 01:42:20 +0000, Ron wrote:

Either blade should cut it just fine. I try to make any butt/rabbet joints proud and flush with a piloted straight router bit after glue up and assembly. You can then do some router roundover on the corners if desired. Carpenters glue thinned with water can be brushed on the machined edges as a sealer and lightly sanded after dry. Paints great.
As always (and taught by one of our departed Hall of Famers, Paully Rad), practice on scrap or you will practice on your project.
-Doug
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I would add to Doug's comments, to wear a good dust mask and have a dust collector / air cleaner going full blast. That MDF dust is like baby powder and will be everywhere if you don't have a decent dust collection method.
Bob S.
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AMEN!
I cut 30-40 sheets a month in my basement on a modified contractor saw... LOVE my dust collector! :-) I also open a window at the far end of the basement and place two 20" box fans in the windows by the saw to suck the airborn dust out. Works great, but gets a bit chilly in the winter (Alberta Canada). ;-)
Dave.
Bob S. wrote:

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Ron wrote:

They will both make clean cuts. You can reduce the amount of dust by feeding at aggressive rates. Make you saw motor work and you will have much less dust in the air and more chips on the floor. The faster feed rates are easier on the blade too, each time a blade tooth goes through the MDF it gets abraded a bit by the stuff, at fast feed rates, each tooth does less total work by the time the cut is done.
Rico
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Not really. You need at least an 80T ATB to get "decent cuts" in MDF

Yes and, for the most part, toxic as well.

Why bother? It's all just sawdust...Actually tho, you might want to use some filler on the edges since the MDF is not as dense in the center and this will show up on the edges. Just slime it and sand smooth when dry.

What else? DD "It's easy when you know how..." Johnny Shines
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On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 18:08:29 -0800, David DeCristoforo

I've had great results with a Freud 40T ATB combo that's too dull to properly cut hardwoods.
He should try what he has before purchasing a new blade.
Barry
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wrote:

I use my lowest quality carbide blade. MDF beats on blades, so what every you use, it will soon become your lowest quality blade. <G>

Even with dust collection, I wear a dust mask. With the DC running, I still end up with a pile of dust in my pockets and at my feet, under the TS.
My favorite place to cut or rout MDF is OUTSIDE!

I prime the whole part with Zinsser BIN, a white pigmented, shellac based primer, sprayed on. No spray gear or it's a smaller project? BIN comes in spray cans. This stuff drys very fast, is great to sand, and fills the edges well.
Any cut or routed edge gets lightly sanded, sprayed, sanded again, etc... until the texture matches the face. Brushing the first coat of two on the cut edges will often seal them faster.
Barry
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You have a jointer? Joint the edges after cutting.
Brian.

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