best finish with polyurethane

Page 3 of 3  

Larry Jaques wrote:
<comments interspersed>

Interesting. I didn't know that they existed even in artists' paints.

I tried "Googling" for an exterior and exterior water soluble oil paint and couldn't find any reference.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ain't technology wunnerful?

I'm so used to alkyd and acrylic latex paints, I tossed a brush with Kilz Oil Based Primer into the sink to wash up one day a few months ago. It took half an hour to get the crap out of the sink, having to dry the water first, then wipe what I could. I had forgotten to bring spirits with me. My (already receding) hairline did NOT appreciate that.
-- We're all here because we're not all there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not sure I am going to buy into that.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 16/08/2010 21:29, Leon wrote:

If you care to mooch round B&Q with a magnifying glass reading the instructions on cans of paint, ..... No, well, can't say I blame you :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

It has nothing to do with the brushes: I just mentioned that as one of the wonders of modern varnishes. http://ronseal.s3.amazonaws.com/documents/tin/DH%20Varnish_750_BoP.pdf
(I agree with what it says on the tine except where it says use a synthetic filament brush: I bought a 'special' looking teflon fine filament brush and it just left trails of bubbles everywhere.)
I don't know if they are all like it these days, but at least some of the Ronseals I've used do wash out pretty well with water: they look kind of cloudy in the tin but dry clear - and I generally go for the 'diamond hard' and find it excellent: and a little goes a long way so it is not as expensive as it seems. They do tend to drip, so the finer the layer you apply the better, and that is where these thin sectioned artists brushes come into their own. (It is a year or so since I last did any varnishing - though there is still plenty needs doing! - so I didn't stick my neck out here to say whether I thinned my last lot with white spirit or water.).
Incidentally I've also used the same brushes with very thinned gloss paint to get a smooth finish on the fiddly bits of window frames too..
S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Spamlet wrote:

Only if it is water based. Not all "modern varnishes" are. ____________

It washes out with water because WATER IS THE SOLVENT in the product. Water base polyurethane, __________
Regarding the sable brushes, I agree that artist's brushes are handy.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

But it does not say so on the tin of Ronseal Diamond Hard that I was talking about: it just says brushes wash out in water, and I'm not psychic to know whether this is because water is the solvent or because there are emulsifiers or surfactants included of whether indeed the solvent might be glycol or alcohol based or based on something I've never heard of.
S

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

Reread your lable.
PREPARATION: Ensure all surfaces are free from wax, grease and oil by wiping with a cloth dampened with white spirit. Bare Wood: Sand smooth with fine sandpaper. Do not use steel wool. Remove dust with a damp cloth.
Do not use steel wool because small broken pieces of it will rust because of the water in the product and stain your finish.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

Alright, I missed the last bit, but it only says there is water in the product not that it is the main solvent: the foregoing part about wiping down with white spirit rather gives the impression that they would not advise you getting water in it. Also, I have found that, unlike water based paints, this varnish does not raise the grain of wood. In fact, I have actually used it as a wood primer when I could not lay my hands on a solvent based one locally, in a hurry.
S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Spamlet wrote:

No, they don't want you to get oil - or grease, etc. - in it. That's why they tell you to clean the surface with alcohol. Water and oil don't mix.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

White spirit is not an alcohol and does not mix with water.
This thread is being trolled. S

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Spamlet wrote:

OK, clean with anything that removes/dissolves oil and grease and does not leave a residue.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Typically you wipe down with an oil based product , paint thinner, so as to not raise the grain and to remove any dust. Paint thinner or better yet mineral spirits will evaporate relatively quickly and then you can use what ever product you want.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed, except that in *UK* DIY 'mineral spirits' is White Spirit.
S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

.3
Is that the stuff that turns thick and milky? I threw out half a gallon because of that. The first quart I poured out of the gallon was clear as was the rest of the container, a few months later it was useless. I mistakenly got the Environmentally safe crap the last time I bought.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Getting a bit deja vu here as we went into this just a little while ago. 'White Spirit' is just a distillation fraction and can contain a range of different solvents that distil in that range. A lot of it is also concocted out of recycled solvents, and it can end up with quite a bit of water in. I used to have to test drums of the stuff for use in various printing industry solutions. Our stock buyers were always looking for the cheapest sources, and this could mean drums with several inches of rusty water in the bottom, and any amount of other goo, and quite a wide range of acidity. If it is only being bottled up for cleaning paint brushes, it doesn't have to be anything special and may indeed be saturated with water and turn cloudy when you go to use it. Also, if you use it and then pour it back in the bottle, some thixotropic modern paints are very good a gelifying in surprisingly dilute solution.
S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wreck only
Since I haven't commented on it yet, isn't that title a bit of an oxymoron? "Best" and "poly" are mutually exclusive, wot?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

Not IMO. I like lacquer best but anytime I want a hard, scratch resistant surface I use poly. OIL poly. If I also want a top coat that doesn't color the wood I use water poly.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.