Belt/Disk sander reviews

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Lew Hodgett wrote:

that I seldom use it. Seems like I alternate between needing coarse grit for evening something out and fine for other uses. I HATE changing the disk, and often cannot use it again because the glue sticks to the metal instead of coming off with the sandpaper. It is much easier to change a belt. Maybe I need several disk sanders with different grits on them.
--
 GW Ross 

 The more you explain it, the less I 
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I'd be curious to know the shape of these push sticks. This as my initial reaction was to use a jointer or a hand plane and/or spoke shave to smooth them. Pretty much any outside curve can be handled with a plane and inside curves with a spoke shave. Using these tools could turn out to be faster than the rasp or sanding...
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

Thank you for that insight, John! It had not occurred to me to use a plane or a spoke shave for the curves--and it was *never* going to occur to me to use a plane that way! I appreciate the lesson!
Bill

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These are good points. Get a heavy belt sander and use it upside down when you need to. Two jobs in one.
For a disc sander, make your own. I used an old motor and mounted a pulley on it, then drilled and tapped three screw holes to hold a round piece of MDF for the disc sandpaper base. You can stick the shaft of the motor out a little past the pulley to use as a pilot center for the disc to keep it centered. I made a rest for the wood out of some plywood and hinged it with some piano hinge on the sides, so I can tilt the rest and sand bevels. On the rest, I also put two threaded inserts to hold a fixed miter gauge so I can repeat the same angle again and again. this is a case where power is not real important. If you press hard enough into the disc that you need a bigger motor, all you do is load up or ruin the sandpaper. I think mine is about 1/5 HP, or about 4 amps.
"woodchucker" wrote in message
On 12/12/2014 5:58 PM, Sonny wrote:

I have a Ryobi handheld that is like the Bosch. It has a sanding frame so it can be used for large flattening. The frame is great.
The flat top on it makes it easy to flip over but I don't need to use it. Like I said b4.
--
Jeff


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or something similar, you need one. It's the most useful tool in the shop, ideal for making tiny adjustments in length or thickness, putting a quick chamfer on an edge, making a square- section piece into a round section (I used mine to make the mast & yards for my sailing dingy)...you'll find it's always on your bench.
John
(* sometimes I think there's too many of us Johns)
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John McCoy wrote:

Lie_Nielsen, huh? I have "something similar"! :)
Cheers, Bill

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Ridgid (two "d"s *) power tools are a bit unpredictable. Most of them are made by Ryobi, I beleive, with corresponding quality. A few of them are made by other vendors (some might even be made by Emerson Electric, who actually own the Ridgid name and make the Ridgid plumbers tools), which sometimes means a higher spec tool.
John
(* the founder's name was Ridge)
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I have no idea what "BS marks" might be but it sands OK to remove/shape material. All plastics do but you get a buildup of fused particles along the trailing edge. Easy to knock off with a file or knife.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Sorry, "BS marks" = marks left by a band saw. Thank you for your answer!
Bill
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FWIW, a 4" handheld belt sander can be tedious to use. For most applications a 3x21 is sufficient and easier to handle.
John
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As I mentioned elsewhere, most Ridgid tools are made by Ryobi.
I leave it to everyone's individual opinions as to the quality of Ryobi tools, and whether Ridgid branded tools are better or worse than Ryobi branded ones.
(but I agree that Menard's house brand is unlikely to be of any better quality).
John
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Not so long ago, if you wanted a plane your choice was either rehabilitating an old Stanley, or buying from Lie-Nielsen. Now there are more choices in quality planes, but out of habit I always recommend L-N. (plus many of the Veritas planes are just plain ugly, whereas the L-N all look like a tool should look).
John
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On 12/14/2014 11:33 AM, John McCoy wrote:

The veritas have some nice features. I like the set screws that center the blade so you don't chip the blade on the corner. Wish the lie nielsen would have that. I don't have any bronze castings, but a friend does and he claims that they color his wood as he works with them and curses them out. my bronze is in the handle on an 60 1/2 block plane, I have the pre-nicker model.
I love my LN dovetail saw. Would like some of their bedrocks... But I like my Veritas low angle #5. I like having multiple blades.
--
Jeff

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John McCoy wrote:

I understand. I probably collected at least 5 or 6 planes (including a block plane and a low angle block plane), all for less than the $115 of that one block plane. I do enjoy admiring the Lie_Nielsen tools though, and others. Woodworking show will be coming around next month.
Bill

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Agreed, by all accounts they're fine planes and the other Lee Valley stuff I have is good. Just some of them don't have the classic look that a plane should have.

Can't say I've observed that. Years ago L-N occasionally did planes in "German Silver", a nickle-based bronze. I have a #2 (which I don't use) and the small block plane in it, and it's probably the ideal metal for planes, except for the cost.
John
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On Sat, 13 Dec 2014 22:00:20 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Not really (made by Ryobi). Both are made by the parent company, TTI, (the other name in the TTI group is "Milwaukee"). Ryobi is meant for the low-end consumer market, while Ridgid is intended for the higher end consumer and low end contractor. Milwaukee, of course, is intended for the pro-sumer or industrial markets.

AIUI, Ridge (Emerson) owns the (Ridge and Ridgid) trademarks but they're licensed to TTI, who actually manufactures most of the tools.
The tool biz is really convoluted.
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Just adding to what you wrote:
In 2014, Tenex Capital Management New York City, NY acquired the JET, POWERMATIC AND WILTON brands from Walter Meier and changed the company name to JPW Industries where they continue to grow and outperform their competition with innovative, quality products and services.
As if you didn't know, all of this consolidation is no good for us!
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Buy the thousand dollar one Bill. You will want it to out last this thread. :-)
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Leon wrote:

Sorry if it got annoying.
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Bill wrote:

tried it myself as a youngster, I remember it making a cloud of dust! <cough, couch> : )
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