Convert a bench grinder into a disk sander?

hello All
please can you help me wit some advice concerning:
1)     I have a Hilka 350W bench grinder motor which has an arbor sticking out of each end, comprising an M10 nut on a threaded portion, and a 1/2" diameter section on which the grinding wheels fitted.
I want to fit some sort of 6"-8" diameter rigid plastic/aluminium disk to it so that I can stick emery cloth disks to it and bear down on the face of the disk, using a tool rest, so I can smooth/shape bits of wood and plastic.
What sorts of search terms ought I to use to find something suitable? I can find lots of things to fit M14 spindles on angle grinders but that won't do.
2)     Also - my other 6" bench grinder is intact and does have a coarse and a fine wheel fitted. is it safe to use the outer face of said disk(s) as an abrasive surface for softer materials (wood, plastic, perhaps aluminium)? I can fashion a suitable tool rest but I a worried about forces acting out of the plane of rotation, compared with the normal mode of use i.e. when the outer edge is the grinding surface.
In pictures:
I've got two bench grinders rather like this, one without wheels and covers, and the other intact:
http://pop.h-cdn.co/assets/cm/15/05/54cb16d1c8206_-_bench-grinders-01-0713-lgn.jpg
I want to turn the incomplete one into something like this:
http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/OthersProjects/Tools/DiscSander1a.jpg
This man's DIY is something similar to my aspirations: https://woodgears.ca/reader/hessam/disk_sander.html
I want to stay safe, but I also want to make use of the spare motor, so any advice would be welcome.
DDS
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On Saturday, 18 March 2017 23:22:19 UTC, Duncan DiSaudelli wrote:

The bearings in a bench grinder only takes radial forces. The thing you want has taper bearings to take axial forces. So forget it. Just go out and buy one.
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On Sunday, 19 March 2017 07:31:10 UTC, harry wrote:

or use a drill
NT
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I hadn't realised the difference in bearings. Thanks for the info - idea now forgotten!
DDS
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Slight tangent. I have a few hand sized metal bits to clean, and first thought was to hold them in a vice then attack with a rotating wire brush in an ordinary B&D drill. However, I do have a pillar drill. Could I mount the wire brush in the pillar drill, and hold the metal bits against the brush or what that also risk ruining the pillar drill bearings? The pillar drill is a cheap but great for my simple needs Silverline.
--
Graeme

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On 3/19/2017 10:41 AM, Graeme wrote:

Its not ideal because the access isn't particularly good, but unlikely to do much harm. Do you mean one of the "disk" type brushes or one where the "bristles" stick out at the end opposite to the spindle?
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I mean the type with bristles sticking out at 90 degrees to the shaft/spindle.
I'm talking about Victorian door furniture which has been allowed to rust over too many years. Plan is to remove all traces of old paint and rust, then treat with gun blue or Zebo.
--
Graeme

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On Sunday, 19 March 2017 17:21:17 UTC, Graeme wrote:

Search youtube for rust removal, there are easier more thorough methods.
NT
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On 3/20/2017 12:46 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

+1. The exact method does very much depend on exactly what you want to clean, though.
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On Sunday, 19 March 2017 10:43:55 UTC, Graeme wrote:

Pillar drills usually have a thrust/tapered bearing at the top of the shaft and a "normal" bearing at the bottom (next to the chuck).
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On 3/19/2017 10:26 AM, Duncan DiSaudelli wrote:

A more significant point is that bench grinders usually run faster than disk sanders.
I am fairly sure that my cheap Machine Mart combined disk and belt sander is based on a standard electric motor with simple has deep groove ball bearings at both ends. The axial load (and also the bending moment) which you apply to a disk sander is usually not particularly high, and I would not expect any problem with deep groove bearings for normal domestic use.
The "drive end" bearing is often larger than the non-drive end. Also, the drive end bearing is usually the "locating" bearing. At the other end, one race of the bearing will usually be a sliding fit with no shoulders either on the axle or in the housing, to accomodate thermal expansion.
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Duncan DiSaudelli wrote:

    If it's a ball race, it won't make any significant difference, Harry has sleeve bearings in mind I think.
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On 19/03/2017 10:26, Duncan DiSaudelli wrote:

There are quite a few DIY from scratch disc sanders on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=disc+sander+build

--
Cheers,

John.
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