BEHR Paint And Primer In One?

BEHR Paint And Primer In One. Most of you have seen the advert. So, is it viable or just another marketing gimmick?
I hate painting and people like me are suckers for a pitch like this. Would I be wasting my time with it or might there be something to it?
All opinions are welcome of course, but I'd really like to see some comments from contractors who have actually tried it out.
Thanks.
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Well... it depends. If you are painting fresh drywall it's probably OK to sand and paint. If you are painting cabinets or trim not so much... you'd generally want to sand, prime, sand, and then top coat things like cabinets and trim to yield a smooth finish. Of course some may not care how smooth the finish is and others would sand the drywall primer before top coating... Thus the correct answer is, It Depends. ;~)
John
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Dave wrote:

Main difference between a primer and a paint is the ration to pigment versus binder. Primers will usually have a lot more binder in the ration than the paint. This gives a good ability to stick to the surface. Paint then can do what it is meant to do - color whatever.
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Michael Joel
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On 3/15/2012 12:56 PM, Dave wrote:

Primer is used to prep the surface for paint. Priming/Prepping is more than just a another layer of paint. It is meant to be sanded and worked to a desired surface. Then you paint once you like the primer surface.
Primer and t all in only simply means the paint is likely to stick and cover in one coat with out a separate layer. BUT if you are not happy with the current surface do you want to use this premium stuff and then sand it to smooth the surface and then reapply??
FWIW most premium quality paints do not need a primer for them to stick to the wall and cover in one coat. I have had great luck with Sears Best Easy Living interior wall paint, not cheap but on sale a bargain. One coat is all I have needed to cover black marks on the wall.
Having said all of that.....
Most people hate to paint because they do not use top quality paints. Painting really is not so bad when you use premium quality paints that stick, flow, and cover in one coat.
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I guess I get what I deserve then. I've always bought relatively cheap paint. This appears to be another example of Festoolism ~ Pay more in the beginning and wind up with a better completed job. Maybe if I start looking for a paint company with green cans?
(Apologies for inserting the Festool blurb. We're all Festool agents on commission. )
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On 3/15/2012 6:30 PM, Dave wrote:

LOL..
I have probably painted more houses than most here in this group, somewhere between 25-30 interiors of complete houses..
Stuff I like to use,
With quality latex paints wall paints a decent brush and roller works well.
Trim is the kicker though.
I prefer to paint with alkid oil based paints for trim. A good and decent sized brush, typically 4" wide. Small brushes simply don't hold enough paint. Purdy and or Wooster make good brushes.
For large flat areas however the 1 "diameter foam brushes that are about 4~6" long work great with oil based paints, almost a sprayed look.
If painting trim with latex a pad brush works great on large flat areas.
Try not to "over work" enamel paints and don't scrape the excess paint off of the brush when reloading, tap the brush against the inside side of your paint container.
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Leon wrote:

I have to ask: Why no "scraping" (the excess paint off of the brush)?
I've only been scraping one side, I think.
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On 3/15/2012 7:10 PM, Bill wrote:

Basically you are leaving most of the paint in the can. If you simply tap the wide side of the brush on the inside of the container only the paint that the brush cannot naturally hold will slough off.
By tapping you will dip for more paint less often and the load on your brush will go farther.
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Leon is right. That is a rookie mistake. If you scrape the paint off the brush, then you build up paint on the edge of your container (NEVER paint from the can - pour you material into something else) each time you do it. After a while you get two things; buildup, and dry paint.
By dragging your brush over the edge (scraping, if you will) to remove excess paint, you will start to pick up drying paint that is thicker than the stuff in the container. The two different viscosities will be more difficult to brush, but more importantly can foul the consistency of your finish. Part of the paint has started to dry, and part is fresh from the bottom of the can. Not good.
Worse, if you are painting long enough, you will start to pick up bits and pieces of dried paint. Maybe no bigger than a grain of sand, but you will certainly see it when your paint dries. When I paint, I pour a couple of inches some in a container with a lid, and a gently slap the brush on the side of the container. Not all the way up to the well, but about halfway up the bristles, which is all I ever stick in the paint anyway. I will gladly dip more often for a smoother finish.
Another benefit to "slapping" instead of scraping, is that you don't cause the well of the brush to suck in paint. When it does, the brush become much less flexible, and the buildup in the well prevents you from having the proper flex and cutting straight lines.
When I am to be away for even 5 - 10 minutes, I always cover my paint. The dollar store is dandy for 3 for a buck resealable containers to toss at the end of the day. And if I am painting all day, I usually have 2- 3 brushes with me, and will use one for an hour, then wash it out and start with another brush, allowing the first one to dry. Paint dries fast in these parts on a summer day, even on the brush.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thank you for a good painting lesson! Now that you've explained the right way to do it, there's no one around qualified to help me! : )
Do you paint a pretty wide strip close to the carpet/baseboard? That seems where I might have some trouble with the recommended strategy--too much paint. I usually use(d) a 1.5" brush there (just "always have"). What is your preference?
Bill

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wrote:

The good brushes are much thicker than regular brushes, so I can get a much straighter line with them. I don't think I've bought a -good- 4" brush, though. We're talkin Festoolish money there.
My favorite is a Painter's Essentials 2-1/2" angled sash. It's a cheaper brush, but it is built like a Purdy. Good quality nylon and polyester bristles, thick, and with a nicely tapered, flagged end. They mold to my hand like they're a part of it. But I can't find them any more. Painter's Essentials BL-02014. I should have gone back to the store the second I realized how good the brushes were. They cost something like $2.50 each!
-- The greatest justice in life is that your vision and looks tend to go simultaneously. -- Kevin Bacon
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Bill, for me personally I like a 2 1/2" angled sash brush. I like them a little stiffer, so Purdys aren't for me. I did like those Painter's Choice that Larry J mentioned, but the last time I saw them in a store (on closeout) was a while back, and I bought a couple.
My second choice is the "other" line of brushes they sell at Shwerwin Williams. Don't remember the name, but they work well.
I am no sure I understand your question about baseboards, so I will tell you how I do them, and you can go from there. On baseboards, I paint the top edge with the wall color and a brush. I try to not go over more than about 1/4" on top of the trim. You can do this carefully without leaning all the way over the trim to eyeball where your wall is going. Just get enough to cover the joint of baseboard to wallboard and you are done.
Then I come back and paint the baseboard. Think this through; you didn't have to lean all the way over and peer at the painted edge because you didn't care if you got a bit on the top of the trim. Now, you can paint the top of the baseboard on your hands and knees, but not with your face pressed against the floor to try to cut the wall edge into the trim edge. Much easier. And not only are you in a more comfortable position to paint, but you can also see much better as the top of the trim will have light from the top (as opposed to the side) on it to see your cut lines while you work.
I do it the opposite way on vertical trims, or trims with complicated patterns. I paint the door trims, bookcase trims, crown moldings and anything else first, then cut the wall paint to it. The reason is that you can cut a better line with your brush if you have more support underneath it. You can control the flex of the brush better, Which means better paint flow control. And if you are cutting against a molded piece such a crown that may have a small profile cut on the edge, it only makes sense to paint the whole trim face first and not spend all the time you need (and possibly an inferior job) to cut in little ridges and small edges that you might slip the brush over quite easily. It just takes too long to cut the trims to the wall, unless it is baseboard. But get your trims painted, and cutting the wall side against the trim is a snap.
As far as cutting against the floor or carpet, I push down the carpet with a 12" putty knife and cut to the knife. If it is wood, I put a quick strip of tape at the shoe mold and paint to it. I never tear out or off trim unless I am replacing it.
Robert
Robert
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On 3/16/2012 2:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: <snip>

i use a wallpaper trim guide, which comes in 24 or 36" lengths to push down the carpet.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I just moved into a house just a few years ago. It has been almost 30 years since I painted and my painting knowledge is not far from where I left it. After acquiring some experience helping dad, I "painted for anyone" for 2 summers. I worked cheap and had plenty of work. I bought my paint on sale at Sears for about $5.99/gal. I noticed that the price of paint has gone up! :) I learned to use the 12" putty knife (& rag!) approach for most of my "tough edges". Your post reveals (obviously) the right way to look at things! TYVM!
Bill
If it is wood, I put a

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On 3/15/2012 9:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

i've found foster's coffee containers are really good. they're wide, resealable, and have a formed in handle that's easy to hold for a long time. also, when you're done, pour out the paint and let it dry in the sun. you can just peel off the dried paint film after about a day and it leaves no residue.
regards, charlie
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I use to use the Sears paints for all my painting needs. I liked the results, too. But our local Sears closed its paint department. I haven't been by, since last summer, to see if it has reopened the department.
Sonny
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