Baseball bats - Ash vs. Maple?

Page 2 of 3  
On 9/24/10 2:41 AM, Stuart wrote:

I saw the smiley, but I find that a good balance is beneficial. I can get shop fever when working too long. Some physical activity out in the fresh air seems to recharge the old batteries, mentally and physically.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, don't misunderstand me. Once a month my eldest daughter and I go for a walk along a canal somewhere. Her boyfriend drops us off and picks us up at the end of the walk. Typically we walk 10-12 miles and hopefully finish in a pub.
I have also recently joined www.midlandhillwalkers.org.uk
I also have a number of other hobbies including photography, which also gets me "out and about" and playing 12-string guitar which doesn't. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/25/10 5:07 PM, Stuart wrote:

That's better than walking laps inside the shopping malls like there do, here.

Are you kidding? How about playing in one of those pubs you end up in? :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, my daughter (flute, "penny" whistle) and I used to play in a ceilidh band, which was great fun, but the guy who lead it decided to call it a day.
In some pubs it would probably go down fine in others......
August we wound up at a place called Fazley junction. The weather was beautiful, there were loads of people about and the canal was busy with boats. It was a good pub, couple of friendly, youngish lads behind the bar and a very nice cider on draught. We sat outside in the sunshine by the tow-path and I reckon we could easily have attracted an appreciative audience if we'd been playing.
September found us in a former mining town called Bedworth in a run down tatty pub where the only cider was bottled and the only "beer" came from one of those chemical factories they sometimes call "breweries". The sort of stuff they "Blow" out of the kegs with CO2. The few locals stared at us like we shouldn't have dared step in through the door and the landlady was a miserable middle aged woman.
Strictly speaking, it would also depend whether the pub had a license to allow live music on the premises (Quaint English law)
Of course, after walking 12 miles or so, what we really want to do is sit down, relax and slake our thirst with a pint or two. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

18th century cricket bats used to be solid, triangular in section and tapered. Bowlers bowled slowly underarm. All was good. As bowlers speeded up and bowled overarm, these heavy bats could no longer be swung easily enough to respond. Batsman sought a lighter, faster bat and began to use a thinner and more "paddle shaped" bat, as today, made of lighter timber like willow. However willow isn't strong enough for this and they broke where the narrow handle broadened into the blade. The fix was to insert a stronger cane handle into a vee slot in the blade - which I believe to be a local invention (Sudbrook, by the chap who was also chief engineer of the Severn Tunnel).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/21/10 10:40 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

The maple bats may be lighter, which is probably why players prefer them (bat speed) but it is definitely more "brittle."
Most of the "power" from a bat comes from its trampoline effect, similar to a tennis racket. The more the bat flexes when making contact with the ball, the further the ball will go.
I started hitting a lot of home runs in softball, in the past few years, and it has nothing to do with me. I'm not a big guy and I haven't gotten stronger in my old age. :-)
The composite alloys they use to make modern bats allow them to flex so much at the handle and also in the face of the barrel, that it's like hitting a golf ball with a tennis racket. When you hit the ball square at the apex of your swing, you can feel the trampoline effect and the ball goes about 360 feet.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I second that. There's a palpable sweet spot.
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They pay the guys a $M a year and can't afford a couple of bucks more for a bat? If Ash is so expensive, why not Hickory?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes and we all know that MLB players have to watch their money as they don't make very much. :) If suitable ash is hard to find, someone forgot to tell the baseball bat manufacturers who turn them out by the million. Mable is just the latest "fad".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/21/10 9:53 AM, Steve Turner wrote:

Same with me. I tried maple stick but they gave no warning, they just snap in half. Most often, Hickory and Oak start to splinter and weaken and you can feel it in your hands, which gives you plenty of warning to switch sticks.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Instead of changing the wood, why not look into some elasticy coating the bats could be covered with? When the bat does break, the coating would (perhaps) keep the bat together at least long enough to slow the speed down to something safer.
The idea is not dissimilar to putting plastic between layers of glass to make them impact resistant.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Right now, it's against the rules. The bats must be made out of a single piece of wood (no laminations or alterations).
Ask me about the "4 outs in an inning" rule. It's a good one.
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/21/10 7:41 PM, Zz Yzx wrote:

Not sure about that. I think there are laminated bats, now. I may be wrong, or maybe they're just experimenting with it in the minors.
In any case, I don't see a need to do anything. If you look at the odds, someone getting hurt by a flying broken bat is about as rare as getting hit by lighting while cashing a winning mega-millions lotto ticket.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've never heard of anyone getting hit by lightning while cashing a winning mega-millions lotto ticket, but I know of a few Cubs players over time who have gotten hit with flying broken bats. Right now, it's just a hazard of being a player.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/22/10 1:32 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Hit and hurt are different animals. But I failed to make my point... Read the article...
"Colvin's upper left chest was punctured by a flying piece of Welington Castillo's(notes) bat as Colvin came home from third to score on a double. If the term "impaled" doesn't do the job by itself, the aftermath makes for one of the scariest baseball injuries in recent memory. Colvin needed to be hospitalized because of a wound described as "fairly deep." Sutures helped to close the wound and a tube was inserted into Colvin's lung to prevent it from collapsing."
That kind of hurt is as rare as what I described and surely doesn't necessitate any further safety measures.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/21/2010 07:41 PM, Zz Yzx wrote:

Ok, I'll bite. What is the "4 outs in an inning" rule?
--
What percentage of the driving populace do you suppose actually
understands the rules of engagement at a four-way stop?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 07:28:42 -0500, Steve Turner

In certain situations, 4 outs can be recorded in one inning, as per the following example:
Tie game. One out, runners on first and third. Batter hits fly ball to outfield, caught (2 out). Runner on third tags and is called safe on the attempted put-out at the plate. Runner on first is thrown out at third (3 out). Defense appeals the tag-up at third (runner left early); he's called out (4th out) and defense succesfully removes the run scored.
It's actually in the rule book last time I checked.
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 21, 8:27pm, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:
news.eternal-september.org:

Duct tape.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would think some good old piss elm aka american elm would make a hellava bat. will not split very easy, it has stringy cross grain and light weight. kinda like the olde piss elm club.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/22/2010 02:56 AM, Ross Hebeisen wrote:

Perhaps, but I'd have to think by now that with the huge popularity of baseball that people have experimented with bats made from almost every wood, but have rejected most species for one reason or other. Going back (once again) to what I know, I can see many parallels between baseball bats and drum sticks. You can make 20 pairs of identical drum sticks from 20 different types of wood, and they will all feel different in a drummer's hand. Some won't hold up to the punishment for 5 minutes, some are way too heavy, some are too light, and some are too rigid and transfer unwanted shock straight to your hands. Very few will have just the right weight and feel, the right "resonance" and "flex", but when they do you KNOW it. I'd have to think that experienced baseball players are just like any other expert in their craft; they like to have just the right tool for the job.
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.