Bandsaw or Drill Press?

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Howdy all-
So it has come to be known that I will be the lucky recipient of a new piece of gear. The quandry is that I'm torn between getting a 14" bandsaw (most lokely the Grizz G0580) or getting a drill press. Not sure which way to go. So for the folks out here that have both: what is your reccomendation as far as which is more indispensable? Sure, I've already got a couple of handheld drills, and a jigsaw, so the basics are covered. I'm leaning toward the bandsaw, it could exponentially increase my production of pukey ducks. ;) Just looking for a sanity check I guess.
TIA- ~Rob
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Tough call. I got the DP first for two reasons. I had a project to do that would be simplified compared to a hand drill, and it was $179 instead of the $600 for a bandsaw. If you have the cash for a BS now, get it and worry about getting a DP later. You won't have to wait as long.
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You better save up a 100 more dollars and get the G0555. You never be sorry you did!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You'll be set for life.

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Rob Sluys wrote:

I got the drill press first because one can drill precise holes, chuck small sanding drums, router bits, etc. Also I already had a scroll saw (nee jig saw) which did all the fancy cuts I needed at the time.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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We don't know what you do; so how could we tell you which tool you need more.
Drill presses are obviously cheaper, and I personally use it much more than I use a bandsaw; so I would chose a drill press. I expect other people use a bandsaw daily.
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Exactomundo! OP: You've got the "basic function" of each tool covered with handheld power tools. Which do you use more in a situation in which a stationary tool would be preferable? And for functions not covered by the handheld tools, who often do you want to drill precisely registered holes, or use other tools that can be safely chucked into a DP, but not in your handheld, vs. how often you want to resaw or cut very thick stock?

valuable to you or me is kinda irrelevant.

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Bandsaw. Not even close
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I agree with Jim. I have both, and need both. But I use the bandsaw in every project I undertake, the drill press I use in about half, but I got along fine without it.
Get the bandsaw.
Andrew
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Rob Sluys wrote:

Bandsaw. Curves...resawing...ripping...
Drill press is nice but I could get along without one with no problem. Not so my bandsaw...not after haveing one.
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If you're going to be drilling metal, definitely get the drill press. If you're only going to be drilling wood, your hand-drill will do just fine so I would get the bandsaw.

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if it's a given dollar amount you'll get a better grade of drill press than bandsaw. I'd rather have a decent drill press than a cheezy bandsaw.
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But, if you can spring for it, a bandsaw is one of the 5 central tools a woodworker needs (David Marks) and you will find all kinds of uses. It is really nice to be able to saw without concern about kickback.
Steve

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On Tue, 24 May 2005 00:22:39 GMT, "Steve Peterson"

Dumb question on my part because all woodworkers should be aware of the possibility of kickback......BUT are you really "that" concerned about kickback ?
Maybe in my deep subconscious mind the work "kickback" is triggered when I am reaching for the power button on a piece of equipment.. but that word really never comes to my conscious mind ...
Bob Griffiths
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Well, I don't have a table saw, and my other option is using my RAS to rip. I made an auxilliary fence that attaches at right angles to the normal fence, and can be adjusted by sliding to the correct distance for the width of the piece. With this, I can safely rip a board up to about 30 inches long, by flipping it end for end. For something longer, I prefer to use the bandsaw rather than push the board under that spinning blade that wants to lift the board and fire it back. I make sure to stand to the side if I do that, and I have had some impressive kickbacks. Since I got my bandsaw, that is my method of choice and safety.
I would like a cabinet saw, but they are such space hogs!
Steve
wrote:

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On Tue, 24 May 2005 16:45:00 GMT, "Steve Peterson"

curious and when you mentioned RAS I honestly understood ..
I have one.. BUT the darn thing has not moved off of a 90 degree cut in the last 25 or so years... LOL
IF I HAD to use my RAS for ripping then I would have to have a good supply of toilet paper in the shop...and Yea...in that case I also would be concerned about kickbacks....
I do have both a Cabinet Saw and a Contractors Saw in my shop... both work much better then my bandsaw for ripping ...But I do understand the space issue... after 40 plus years in this hobby my shop is a heck of a lot smaller today then it was originally...
Enjoy Bob
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On Sun, 22 May 2005 09:42:35 -0500, Rob Sluys

WILL...
I vote for a floor model drill press ... I can not remember which I purchased first..(been 30 years or so)...But I use one of my THREE DRILL PRESSES much more then I use my ONE bandsaw...
Your requirements may be completely different then mine...I would hate to be without either...but I WOULD NOT give up my l drill press...
Lots of luck...
Bob Griffiths
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Rob Sluys wrote:

Bandsaw. No question. I own both but there are things that are easiest done on the bandsaw. I can make do without my drill press most of the time by using a cordless drill.
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I would get the drill press first for a couple of reasons. First, the difference in accuracy between the jigsaw and the bandsaw is not anywhere as huge as the difference between handheld and drill press. With both saws, you are hand-guiding the work through the saw. In a drill, the orientation is controlled in the DP where it is nonexistent in the hand drill. Secondly, there is a much wider range of attachments available for the drill press. I have a mortiser attachment which I use almost as often as the straight drill. Finally, the difference in price is very significant. I have the Ryobi 12" benchtop drill press and use a MSC horizontal/vertical bandsaw and a Delta 3 wheel benchtop bandsaw. The bandsaws costed about $200 for these relatively small units, and you are looking at a 14" model around $500-600. My drill press cost $150 for a fairly good model. Hope this advice helps.
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wrote:

I really thing that it depends on what kind of stuff you do a lot of.. If I'm turning wood, (most of the time), I use the band saw every day..
If I'm working flat wood, I don't use the band saw much, but rely heavily on the drill press for "pre-drilling" screw holes, general drilling and drum sanding..
Actually, looking back over the years, I never really felt the need for a band saw until I got into the "mass turnings" addiction.. *g*
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I've had a drill press for about a dozen years. About a year ago I finally got a bandsaw. Both are great. Today, I would not like to be without either.
After some thought I have come up with one justification for drill press before bandsaw which has not yet been brought up.
The two bandsaw tasks that are really tough to do via other methods are tall resaws and curves in thick stock. These are both operations which start to come into play on more advanced projects. By contrast, the things that a drill press are good at that are tough to work around are precision boring with big bits. (for instance using a 35mm forstner bit to bore the recess for a cabinet hinge.
If you buy the notion that as we evolve as woodworkers we gravitate from simple (flat, square, 1-by stock) projects to more complicated (rough stock, variable thickness, more curves). The need for drill press operations comes into the picture earlier in this evolution.
-Steve

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