Baltic birch?

I recently bought some Baltic birch and when I got it home discovered it had "football" patches here and there. Not visible on a quick look under store lighting, but obvious on close examination under good light.
I don't remember this problem with Baltic birch that I've bought in the past. Was I just lucky before? Has the quality changed? Or did I get something that claimed to be Baltic birch but was a cheaper approximation?
It does have the correct number of plies and fairly thick surface layers.
I told the clerk at Windsor Plywood that I needed good both sides, and he said no problem. I can't take it back because I had them saw it into pieces that fit in my car - and that my old muscles could handle :-).
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On 11/27/2015 6:49 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

You asked them to cut to size Baltic Birch ply with TWO GOOD SIDES. If you cannot reconcile what you got with the term/standard TWO GOOD SIDES, then I think Windsor Plywood has a problem, not you - irrespective of the fact that those sheets have been cut down.
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Unquestionably Confused wrote:

The problem may be that "good" is not inconsistent various of the lettering strategies (AB, AC, etc.), that standardize the product . The "football patches" do not necessarily mean "not good". My wife bought a table, new from a store (for about $150), having a football patch on top. I just accept that it is what it is. You'd never notice it unless you went looking. If the quality purchased does not meet the standard sold (to the OP), then he has a good argument for a return. One might argue that the salesman didn't do his job properly, but surely the burden is on the purchaser to understand what he is buying. The adjective "good" is relative, I think (I am not an expert). Surely there are few here that will back me up, or tell me I'm wrong--that "good" has a specific meaning (it could be that "good" means A or B, I forget...).
Bill

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wrote:

I've seen a lot of baltic birch with footballs. It will not have any voids though - even defects in inner plies will have "footballs" to correct them.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Look under "grades" on the following table https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plywood
Those "grades", as well as his or her eyes maybe : ), are what the purchaser should be using in buying plywood. The grading helps commoditize a product that is inherently Not uniform from one piece to another. They/we cannot afford to just discard every piece that is not "perfect". Some of you may forgive my posting this even though I lack as much experience as some others. I know what plywood grades mean because it is related to my pocketbook! (lol)
Bill
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says...

Very incomplete.

If it's critical, inspect each sheet before purchase. There are so many grading systems out there that just relying on the grading when you don't know for sure what system was used is an invitation to disaster.

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On 11/27/2015 7:49 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

I think the faces should be clean.
--
Jeff

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says...

What I believe to be the latest standard for Baltic Birch grading can be found at <http://www.abh- system.hu/f/letoltesek/retetgelt_lemez_szabvany_orosz_gost_3916_1- 96.pdf> Note Appendix A, which shows the relationship with prior grading standards.
The highest grade of Baltic Birch I can find anywhere is variously B/BB or AB/B (same grade, different edition of the standard) which allows boat patches on the back.
I presume that E/I can be found somewhere, but I have no idea where.
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On 11/27/2015 6:49 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Usually buy 5x5 Baltic Birch strictly for its structural integrity, and for it's generally consistent plies with lack of voids, not for it's face appearance, so patches are not considered a defect as long as I did not spec B/BB.
If you specified B/BB, you would certainly have a case to get it replaced. Nothing to lose by asking.
That said, plywood today is not the plywood of your youth ...
--
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On Sat, 28 Nov 2015 00:49:16 +0000 (UTC)

you could take it back or make something with a football theme
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On 11/27/2015 7:49 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

"Good" has about zero meaning in the world of lumber. Good to me means it is good enough for what I plan on using it for. Good to a lumber yard means people will buy it and they will make a profit. Wood grades have specific meanings, and "good" is not a grade. Even within specific grades, there is enough overlap/misgrading/lying that you can get screwed if you don't look before you buy.
Having said all that, the clerk should have explained what grades they carry and briefly what they meant, related to what you actually needed/wanted.
--
Jack
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was asked to examine the sheets before they were loaded on my vehicle to ensure that they were not damaged nor have any defects. Whether it is bananas or plywood or lumber, one should check to see if it meets your needs (and price) before you purchase it.
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On Mon, 30 Nov 2015 10:41:02 -0500, EXT wrote:

Agreed. But the patches weren't easily spotted in the light available. And I'd never had any problem before and I'd always bought from this supplier.
I can hide most of the patches but I will be discussing the problem with the vendor next time I'm in the store.
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