Are you as careful with everything as you are with your woodworking?

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On Thu, 09 Feb 2006 12:49:45 GMT, B a r r y

But it isn't like you're worrying about being a precise distance above the ground or anything. Of course, you'd need a really, really long tape measure... ;)
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Brian Henderson wrote:

Actually, sometimes you are, it's all relative.
There are times when you need to fly on precision that takes similar effort to "half a 64th" woodworking.
Barry
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 13:03:37 +0000, B a r r y opined:

As this thread has already gone OT, I'll ask: what are some examples of such flying? Low level flying? Instrument landings in crappy wx? Night carrier landings? Just curious...
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 15:22:05 GMT, Australopithecus scobis

Crowded TCAs? Like LAX, SNA, LGB?
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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

Of course.

Another, but GPS greatly simplifies things.

I've never done one or ridden along on one, and don't plan on it. <G>
Others: - gusty crosswind landings on tight fields - "suddenly defective" aircraft - flight in very busy controlled airspace, like the NYC metro area - with an FAA or Designated Examiner on board
Precision aside, an enjoyable, safe flight usually is the result of proper planning, setup, and the checking of available information, just like a precise woodworking operation. For instance, a trimmed, stabilized, precisely flown airport traffic pattern makes for an easy landing, just like a properly executed rip on a well-adjusted saw.
Barry
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On Thu, 09 Feb 2006 20:34:18 GMT, Brian Henderson

If Lee Valley doesn't stock one, they will when the demand goes up.. *g* Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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In my case it was a little different. After some serious health problems in the early 90s I learned I had to stop being such a perfectionist. I learned that everything I do doesn't have to measure up to the standards that I wanted to have, and were almost impossible to achieve. After many years of desire I was able to start woodworking and really enjoy it because I no longer wanted or needed to demand that what I produced met someone elses standards. End result was/is I feel better, have sold some of my woodworkings and carvings, have been allowed to meet some great people though my hobby, and enjoy my retirement. All for now.
tks.....Dan J
wrote:

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B a r r y (in JTGGf.11402$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr24.news.prodigy.net) said:
| Brian Henderson wrote: || || Is there anything else in our lives, as woodworkers, where we're as || exacting as we are when we're out in the shop? | | Flying. I check my flight planning more than my cutlists, and put | up with comments about "anal" preflight inspection. <G>
My shop is in an aircraft hanger with a great view of a grass strip. You'd have gotten a kick from watching the guy this past summer who tried three times to get up enough airspeed to take off -- with a completely flat tire.
The memory still has me ROFLMAO.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Morris Dovey wrote:

As anal as I am during preflight, I've left wheel chocks all over the northeast and southeastern US.
Someone actually looked up the tail number and mailed one set back to us. They're simply 2x4's diagonally ripped and paired up with a rope, so we're guessing someone wanted to break our balls. <G>
I haven't left any in Canada, yet!
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On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 12:57:10 GMT, B a r r y

damn... reminds me of my constant problem with the RV trailer.... You put a 4 x 6" under the tongue jack and jack it up... then you lower the jack when you leave and drive away without throwing the block in the back of the truck..
The next time you want to unhitch the trailer, you have no block and the jack won't lift the trailer high enough to clear the hitch without it.. *groan*
Found 2 solutions to the problem, one woodworking related: Cut a shit load of blocks and keep them in the truck..
Also, SWMBO shares job of checking before we leave to find the block on the ground, the vent I left open, the power cord still plugged in, etc... Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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People who complain about pre-flight checklists should be offered the chance to walk. From about 5k ft.
Flying, like woodworking, involves large amounts of kinetic energy which, improperly managed, is just a statistic waiting to happen. Many interesting events in both fields are punctuated by people saying "Oh shit, what just happened". This is usually preceded by the person doing something they've done a thousand times, and this time they didn't run their safety check first.
It would not be at all unreasonable to print up safety checklists for all my power tools and place them prominently by the power switches.
Short version 1). Make sure thing does not Kill You. 2). Turn on.
Make the young woodworkers read and follow them. Make them use hand saws etc. for failing to follow them.
May be wise to add label to arbor nut wrenches too... Hold power cord in other hand.
All old pilots I know are anal about their checklists.
--
Dana Miller

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On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 20:42:09 GMT, Brian Henderson

probably the same degree for most things, but I don't consider myself a good woodworker... I do tend to have more patience in the shop than on a lot of things, but that's probably because I got into wood to relax..
In my experience, the folks who's work I've really admired are basically pretty anal in their wood and just about every facet of their lives... I'm not saying that being a perfectionist is good or bad, just what I've observed.. Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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I'm a Drill Instructor. I am very precise just ask my Officer candidates....:-) Rich

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Do you teach them to twist left or right??
Sorry, as a former NCO, I had to say that... and it's on topic!
Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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