Are Dovetail Joints becoming a thing of the past?

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Actually I built a dozen small cubby boxes to hold little stuff in the kitchen. I used a veneer on the fronts to hide the box joints.
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"Leon" wrote:

The operative word above is SMALL.
Lew
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6" tall and about 6" wide out of 1/4" thick stock.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

It'd just an opinion, of course, but I kinda like half-blind box joints. /Pinned/ half-blind box joints can be interesting, too - just leave the pin standing when cutting the "blind" recess...
:)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I don't see the problem. Use a router with a bit the size of the desired fingers. Same mechanism as half-blind dovetails.
Not much point though except maybe on a really tiny box where you could use a 1/8" straight bit for itty bitty fingers.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

The problem with that approach is that the diameter of the router bit has to be dead nuts accurate, which in my experience most of them aren't, or else you need to do some fine tweaking on spacing to avoid a joint that is too loose or too tight. With dovetails you can fine tune the fit with cut depth, with box joints you don't have that option.
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J. Clarke wrote:

The Leigh jig uses an elliptical bushing and a bit smaller than the desired finger size. You turn the router base slightly to adjust the fit.
Woodworking magazine used a pattern bit smaller than the desired finger size and aluminum tape on the sides of the fingers to adjust the fit.
Chris
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Actually you adjust the bushing slightly and keep the router orientated the same for a repeatable cut.
I have to wonder however why they changed over to this set upas the D series system used a tapered bushing. Rotating the router had no adverse effect on the cut assuming the set up had the bit centered in the bushing.
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Well for starters dovetail joints look good and "right". I know that is purely subjective, but I don't think I alone there. The machinery to make them is readily available for high end mass production, cabinet shops, and the home shop. They can even be made by hand. This indicates to me that they will be around for a long time to come.
None of the above can be said about the Knapp joint.
Box joints meet most of the above but they just don't look right on furniture to me. For utility use though they are fine. (IMHO.) I don't see why one couldn't make a half blind box joint just as easily as a half blind dovetail joint by using a similar template and router except using a straight bit. Art
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"Artemus" wrote:

You could make the joint; however, you loose the wood to wood interference and must depend on the shear strength of the adhesive when on say a drawer, you pull on the front to open the drawer.
Lew
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There is lots of precident in architecture/design previously functional elements becomming a part of the aesthetic domain long after their origin purpose became moot.
By analogy, hops used to be a beer presevative, now it's a required flavoring.
I have no doubt that maufacturers will continue to mass-produce ineligantly proportioned DT's obscured by epoxy-coated drawer slides in "cherry-finish" kitchen cuboards.
For me, I don't think I will ever make a dovetail again for purely functional reasons. I've cut them by hand and I have cut them with a jig. I'm sure that I will do it for "heirloom" work (BTW, kitchen drawers to not quality), but certainly would not bother anymore for a shop drawer.
A lock-rabbet in conjuction with a glued-in plywood bottom creates drawer that would only come apart by smashing the drawer to bits. That's strong enough for my needs, it presents face grain on the front and is a whole lot quicker to execute.
-Steve
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