Are energy-saving light bulbs now a thing of the past already?

Several years ago, when bulbs exactly like this one
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/01_01/kidbulbMS0501_228x355.jpg
were introduced, various shops, Sainsbury's in particular, ran promotions to buy them for 50 pence each. I bought about a dozen.
Now I've used my last one, so I started looking around for replacement bulbs. To my utter astonishment, not a single shop in Spalding sold them! They had plenty of LED bulbs and they also had plenty of the so-called "old-fashioned" filament bulbs, which I thought had been banned. But the low wattage (11W = 60W) energy-saver bayonet bulbs were unobtainable anywhere.
Even when I look on Amazon they are few and far between and cost over £2 each.
So is everyone now converting to LED bulbs? What the heck are people putting in their lamp sockets?!!
<puzzled look>
MM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MM wrote:

    In theory, you should not need to replace low energy bulbs for many years. Unfortunately, the more recent products have a very short lifespan IME. I still have 30yr old low energy lamps running, a bit dim I suppose, but not failing catastrophically. The 5p lamps were a taxpayer funded giveaway which has expired. you might get a better price in Poundland. I recently have been looking for new lamp fittings and I have found that most of them are now apparently made for halogen lamps. Bayonet,ES and SES light fittings seem to be in short supply.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yep, it's weird the way the government and retailers pushed them onto consumers with really low prices and now they've disappeared. I'll try Poundstretcher in Spalding next week. Not an urgent problem as I can get filament bulbs easily and still have at least a dozen Status brand 60W ones.
One advantage of the energy-saver ones is that they don't trigger the circuit breakers when the bulb goes like nearly always happens with filament bulbs. Most irritating on a winter's night when you enter a room, switch on the light and bingo! Bulb "pops", lighting circuit on that floor goes dead and you have to scrabble around in the garage to get to the consumer unit to flick the switch back up.
MM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Mar 2015 11:41:23 +0000, MM wrote:

many

In which case you may not have the correct breakers ... I vaguely recall you can get "slow blow" breakers ...giyf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/03/15 12:01, Jethro_uk wrote:

Type C rather than Type B - but the requirements on low circuit impedance are more onerous which means it's not a suitable swap unless you test your circuits (R1+R2 aka L-E loop test) first and also factor in your primary earthing system.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Mar 2015 14:15:19 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

Tx - I just remember the first time we had a bulb blow after I upgraded our fusebox to MCBs. I reset the thing, and then wondered why it had blown. Of course for the briefest of seconds there's an arc across the filament, which has a resistance close to zero - I=V/R becomes close to infinite ...
It's the same reason you need ballasts for discharge lighting, I believe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


The arc is in series with the filiment.
It's the same reason you need ballasts for discharge lighting, I believe.
The ballast provides the high voltage "bump" to initiate the tube. And thence limits the current as the ionised gas has very low resistance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/03/2015 14:37, harryagain wrote:

One arc is, but if the plasma from that arc bridges the feed wires to the filament then you get a huge pulse of current. It is most often a problem with spotlights where the rising hot plasma from the initial small arc almost invariably does short out the mains for a moment.
Filament spotlamps are generally fused for this reason but a mains circuit breaker is often quicker and takes the lighting circuit out. LED spotlamps are much better in this regard.

The starter uses the ballast to create the initial ionisation but once it is conducting a gas discharge tube has a negative effective dynamic resistance with current rising with decreasing voltage and it would self destruct if there wasn't a ballast to keep the current within safe working limits.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Really? Not got that much experience of LEDs yet. Waiting for them to produce a decent colour spectrum (close to halogen which I like) which they might well one day.
However, I did use an very expensive LED in one fitting where it was suitable, and it blew up in the most spectacular way after a shorter time than a tungsten would have lasted. And tripped the MCB.
--
*No husband has ever been shot while doing the dishes *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26/03/2015 10:51, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I got some of the non-dimmable Philips warm white LED spots as they were remaindered after the introduction of dimmables. They are indistinguishable from the filament bulbs apart from being very slightly more tightly focussed onto the bench. Very nicely engineered with a substantial finned aluminium heatsink behind them.

Only had one LED unit fail so far in about two years. MTBF No different to CFLs except they tend to stop completely rather than fade out into oblivion or blacken one end electrode and fail to start properly.
The failure was of a particularly cheap and nasty Chinese rectified mains series connected 60 ish surface mount LED ones on poxy pcb.
I took it apart after failure - one LED defunct.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got some halogen and some similar light output LED's in ceiling fittings in the hallway (upward facing frost glass shades. I can't tell the difference between them.

I had one LED bulb die in <24 hrs - started flickering and went a lot dimmer. But that's the outlier, others seem to be doing fine so far.
--
Chris French


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One of our cops was, by a hit man most likely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And most unlikely IMHO to actually make much difference when a lamp blows.
--
Adam


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jethro_uk wrote:

    Fuses work well!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My experience is the same. LEDs are the one to go for now. I have them in the rooms most used. Better than CFL by far. I use the remaining CFLs in rooms not much used. I bought apile of the 5p lamps & still have some. I don't have any incandescent.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/03/2015 11:13, Capitol wrote:

You have actually paid £500 for those bulbs in the past 5/10years. It's the stealth tax added on to your energy utility bills. Currently you are paying around £100/annum to subsidise those with electricity generating solar panels on their roofs.
--
mailto: news admac {dot] myzen co uk

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Total drivel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I find I seem to be replacing CFLs about every eighteen months or so - which is much shorter than the expected life but long enough to pay for themselves against filament bulbs many times over.
The pound shops sometimes stock them - Phillips brand in one of ours - but they don't always have the bases I require. I bought a load of E14 ones when they had them but now I want E14s all they have are standard bayonet.
Wilco's own brand CFLs seem to be okay but the pricing structure seems weird. If you are not in a hurry then they sometimes have pretty good promotions on things like that and it makes it worth stocking up at those times.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well I am.

LED (General purpose) bulbs, I get mine on-line from CPC-Farnell usually when I'm already buying something else.
Just put some standard bulbs to replace RO80 in the kitchen. ES fitting. Much nicer. The silly "fluorescent" type bulb in the lounge now has a 10w white LED and I can read again - instant startup, similarly in the bathroom. Maybe a bit too bluish white but you can get warmer white which I have elsewhere.

Puzzled at puzzled look.
--
AnthonyL

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 25 Mar 2015 12:19:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@please.invalid (AnthonyL) wrote:

Because no one has explained WHY these bulbs, once all the rage, are no longer available anywhere! Least, not around here.
MM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.