radial arm saws a thing of the past

never bought a radial arm saw but they were once so popular
am sure this has never been discussed here before
guess everyone buys a mitre saw instead but i would take a radial arm saw if i saw one on the curb
good for large rough lumber
four bys and six bys etc
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I don't think anyone is saying a radial arm saw is awful, horrible, terribl e, evil. It just doesn't really have much use for the vast majority of peo ple. It does some things very well. As you said, cutting large 4x4, 6x6, big rough lumber. Something very few people do much of. If I owned a sawm ill, I would likely have a radial arm saw sitting around because it can cro ss cut a 24" wide board that is 4 inches thick. But other than a sawmill, who needs that ability? A radial arm saw is good for cross cutting up to a bout 24" I think. 12" is the most almost anyone needs though. Crosscuttin g at 90 degrees only. Its not good to adjust the angle to 45 degrees or an ything else. Not accurate except at 90 degrees only. Don't think its safe or good at compound cuts either. Miter saws and sliding miter saws do eve rything the radial arm saw does, except more accurate and easier.
An analogy. Hammers. Compared to air guns. Everyone owns a hammer or man y. Cheap and easy to use. But if you go to a professional house building, construction site, you will see few hammers being used. Everyone will hav e one swinging from their belt. But not using them. Air guns are faster a nd better for nailing wood together. Take installing trim. An air gun can shoot a 15, 16, 18 gauge nail exactly where you want. Harder to precisely nail with a hammer a little trim nail exactly. Air guns are just better i n most cases. But like the radial arm saw, manual winging hammers are need ed in some specific situations.
On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 2:09:51 PM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

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On 6/29/2017 3:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Well, not dadoes & rabbets.
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On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 3:49:49 PM UTC-5, Greg Guarino wrote:

, except more accurate and easier.

The only reason I still have mine around is just for those two reasons. Al though I don't know why at this time... I haven't built but a handful of ca binets in the last ten years.
When I did a lot of office/warehouse finish outs they spec'd out "paint gra de" cabinets, and it was a snap to dado in the sides for permanent shelf pl acement. Likewise, turn the motor parallel to he fence and do rabbets.
Unless the fully spec the cabinets, I go to HD and buy their unfinished oak cabs, ready for paint. I take the doors off, spray the carcass, then the doors and reassemble. MUCH cheaper time/labor/material wise than building them from scratch at this point, and the customers are more impressed with getting the color they want than the quality of the cabinets. Besides, if the cabs are a bit flimsy, it is easy enough to reinforce the frames, drawe rs, etc. as needed.
Guess I should put the saw out to the curb for EC.
Robert
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On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 3:51:30 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
...snip...

...snip...
Not everything. It's pretty hard to cut a 12" wide, 3/8" thick steel plate on a miter saw. Put a metal cutting blade on radial arm saw and make multiple passes, increasing the depth of cut each time. It takes time, but if the plate is properly secured and you have a lot of patience, you can make some extremely accurate cuts.
Try cutting the steel for this on miter saw.
http://i.imgur.com/JRkBl2y.jpg
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On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 9:02:17 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I cut metal with a hacksaw, jigsaw, or reciprocating saw. Its also possible to cut on a table saw. Just put the metal cutting, grinder blade on it and run the metal against the fence.
Several people have mentioned cutting dadoes and rabbets on the radial arm saw. I've heard that is deadly and dangerous. Not something I would want to do when I have a nice table saw to safely cut dadoes and rabbets.
The radial arm saw can do lots of things. You can rip on the radial arm saw too! It just doesn't do much well. Its mediocre and/or dangerous for many of the things it does.
Put a metal cutting blade on radial arm saw and make multiple

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On Thu, 29 Jun 2017 19:28:34 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

These cuts aren't dangerous because the blade can't be pinched. It's rips that are dangerous (crosscuts much less so).

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On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 10:28:39 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Look at the edges on the pieces of steel shown in the image I posted. Do you really think you could produce an edge like that on a 3/8" thick plate with hacksaw, jigsaw, or reciprocating saw? Would you really try to cut pieces that small on a table saw?
There is no way you could produce those results with any of the tools you've mentioned.
Besides, your claim was that "Miter saws and sliding miter saws do everything the radial arm saw does, except more accurate and easier."
Bull. They can't do this:
http://i.imgur.com/JRkBl2y.jpg
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Heard from who? Do you own one yourself? Have you ever? If not then perhaps you shouldn't be arguing with people who do.

Based on what experience?
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On Fri, 30 Jun 2017 20:15:30 -0400, "J. Clarke"

If I could only have ONE power woodworking tool it would be the best radial arm saw I could get my hands on, with all the attachments available for it.
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On Thu, 29 Jun 2017 19:28:34 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Actually the miter/chop saw is just as dangerous.
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wrote:

Not at all. They don't come to get you.
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Or try cutting dado's, or mounting a molding cutter, or do some horizontal boring, or. Ripping a board with a miter or sliding miter saw. I have done all of the above when I had a RAS.
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You just need a GOOD Radial Arm Saw, and there was a LOT of JUNK sold as Radial Arm Saws. I had a cheap Craftsman round arm and I smashed it up before putting it on the ketrb. A good De-Walt, or even the expensive craftsman, is a TOTALLY different animal. My neighbour's old dewalt is extremely accurate, but ever since he had the motor rewound, if it gets overloaded it reverses, and kicks the work out of the saw - which DOES make it dangerous!!
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On 6/30/2017 10:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I actually did all of the above with a Craftsman RAS, new 1979 ish.
My neighbour's

Crap!
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wrote in message
I don't think anyone is saying a radial arm saw is awful, horrible, terrible, evil.
*** No only a Delta RAS is awful, horrible, terrible & evil. Most others are fine within their power and size specifications.
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On Thu, 29 Jun 2017 12:51:25 -0700 (PDT)

most tools that get a bad rap are due to usage by the uninitiated
one has to be in physical control of the radial arm saw or it will grab
cut speed has to be controlled manually and that has surprised a few people i am sure

there were some higher end radial arm saws that did well with angles usually larger too like 14 or 16 inch saws

blade technology also makes a big difference first time i used a freud on the skilsaw it really felt like a different saw

something about hammering nails sometimes it is just fun
but palm nailers and air guns are a lot of fun too
hammers will always be around but looks like fewer and fewer choices if you want a radial arm saw
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On Mon, 3 Jul 2017 19:44:34 -0700, Electric Comet

No, it's due to the intrinsic danger. These tools *are* dangerous.

Not unless something goes wrong. If it does...

Really? Tables saws are automatic? Bandsaws are automatic? Really?

You can thank the snowflakes. Remember, Radial Arm Saws are known to cause cancer.
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On 7/3/2017 9:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

[snip]

But only when used to saw wood and wood byproducts over a long period of time without using a HAZMAT suit and breathing apparatus.
Hell, even the Saw Stop carries a risk of cancer. Haven't you read about the potential heath risks of nitrates in those hot dogs they cut up?
;-)
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On Mon, 3 Jul 2017 22:18:17 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

Don't expect to live long if you eat one, either.
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