Applying veneer

I have been trying to learn how to apply veneer on a small project. Based on some early discussions in rec.woodworking I was using the technique of applying PVA glue to both surfaces, let it dry then place the veneer on the substrate and use an iron to heat the veneer and activate the glue. When I did this the veneer started cracking from the heat and also pulled apart at the butt joints (I needed three panels of veneer to span the small table top). Any suggestion on how to apply veneer?
Russ
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On Sun, 1 Feb 2009 20:25:00 -0500, "Russ Stanton"

Hi Russ,
There are both glue issues, and issues of technique.
This might help:

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=&search_query=veneering&aq=3&oq=veneer

All the best,
--
Kenneth

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I just used something called Better bond found at this sight http://www.veneersupplies.com/ worked great.
I am also new to veneering this sight was wealth of information http://www.joewoodworker.com/articles.htm
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You can apply cold press veneer to the substrate surface only. Apply the wood veneer immediately and clamp.
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Russ Stanton wrote:

A. Your iron on problem was most likely caused by too hot an iron for too long and/or trying to apply it too soon after you applied the glue to it. The glue added a LOT of water to the veneer which means the veneer was much enlarged...it needs to return to its former size before ironing on; it is going to take a couple of days at least. I've not done a lot of iron on veneering but I've had better results with the procedure by applying glue ONLY to the substrate. That way the veneer doesn't curl up into a tube :)
B. Cold pressing is better IMO. The biggest problem with that is getting sufficient pressure in the center. The conventional answer is a veneer press or shaped cauls but I think this would work well (haven't tried it but will one day)...
3/4 ply oversized 3"-4" thick foam rubber oversized cover sheet (brown wrapping paper, etc) veneer glue substrate 3/4 ply oversized
Clamping the plywood to the substrate along the edges compresses the foam, foam applies a relatively even pressure over all the substrate.
--

dadiOH
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(I needed three panels of veneer to span the small table

I assume you are taping these pieces together with veneer tape?
I like to use Unibond 800. It's NOT water based, so the veneer won't curl when the glue is applied. Unibond also has a long open time, so you don't have to scramble to get all the clamps tight befor ethe glue starts to set.
I usually buy it at:
http://www.vacupress.com/veneerglue.htm
I also bought a veneering DVD from this site. He goes over the basics in great detail and it was really helpful.
Mitch
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