Another sketchup question

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On 4/16/2014 10:06 AM, Leon wrote:

Section tool? I have to check that out. Offset or section... I use the offset a lot... Funny I was making a hole in a ply plate, and used the offset to draw it. then pushed it back down through the ply... from the top it looked all the way through. From the bottom no... Hmmmmm. over and over I struggled. Finally highlighted the hole, and hit delete... BINGO.. not everything works as expected, but there seems to be a way. Not always so intuitive... especially zooming... I find I have to go to the other side of the view to zoom out to re-center, so I can get to the piece I want to see. If I just put my mouse over the area I want to bring in, I still can't see the rest of that.. so goto the other side, zoom out, then mouse to the center of what I want to see and zoom in... I know I can do shift middle and drag, but that is a pain sometimes, too many operations.
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On 4/16/2014 9:24 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Section tool. IIRC it is a group of tools that you might have to select to show up from the View/Toolbars window.
You select the section tool and click it on a surface, it will immediately show a larger see through but bordered window on the surface that you clicked. Next select the border of that section window and move it toward the object. For small movements you will probably have to zoom in. If you do this right it will make the object/component appear to have been run through the planer several times to expose the insides of the pieces.
Extremely easy to use once you understand the concept. When I took drafting in school many many years ago we had to draw the section plane and draw what we imagined to be the look inside the part had we sliced away a section.

Just stick with it. It will get easier and easier. I am continuously finding faster and easier ways to do things. Just like the section plane i mentioned above. That just came to me this last night.
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You are aware that the measurement reported depends upon the precision you have set in "Model Info", right?
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On 4/16/2014 10:59 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Yes I am. Thanks.
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Make it into a component before you draw other stuff touching it..
Another way is to draw what you want to make into a component away from everything else, make it a component and then move it where you want it.
Barring those, you could use layers...draw one thing on a new layer...draw something else on a different new layer. Hide either layer and you can easily select what's left to make it a component. Making components as you go is easier
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On 4/15/2014 3:57 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Maybe a little later.. still a newbie at this.
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On 4/15/2014 3:32 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Although Layers can be handy (and essential to work flow in modeling construction/fabrication projects), be aware that Layers can cause major frustration, especially if you start the practice of drawing on specific layers only.
An essential rule to follow, and the absolute best way to use Layers when modeling in SU, is to first assemble your geometry into either groups and/or components on Layer 0, and then assign those, ONLY after they have been grouped/made into a component, to a specific layer.
As familiar as I am with SU modeling on a daily basis, I occasionally get bit by this and it can be difficult and time consuming to correct, even on even small, uncomplicated models; and especially deadly on complicated models with lots of groups and component parts.
Here, found this that explains it quicker than I can type it. Copy it somewhere and put it your saddlebags for later, you will be glad you did:
<quote> How To Avoid Problems with Layers in Google Sketchup (by Adrian Chopra)
~ Do all your modeling on Layer0. Keeping all your loose geometry (that’s not part of a group or component) together in one place is the only way to make sure that you don’t end up with edges and faces all over the place. SketchUp, unfortunately, lets you put geometry on whatever layer you want, which means that you can end up with a face on one layer, and one or more of the edges that define it on another. When that happens, it’s next to impossible to work out where everything belongs.
~ Don’t move anything but groups and components to other layers. If you’re going to use layers, follow this rule: Never put anything on a layer other than Layer0 unless it’s a group or a component. Doing so ensures that you don’t end up with stray edges and faces on separate layers.
~ Use layers to organize big groups of similar things. More complicated SketchUp models often include things like trees, furniture, cars, and people. These kinds of things are almost always already components, so they’re perfect candidates for being kept on separate layers.
~ Don’t use layers to organize interconnected geometry; use the Outliner instead. Interconnected geometry means things like building floor levels and staircases. These model parts aren’t meant to be physically separate from other parts like vehicles and people are.
~ Feel free to use layers to iterate. Iteration is the process of doing multiple versions of the same thing. Lots of designers work this way to figure out problems and present different options to their clients. Using layers is a great way to iterate: You can move each version of the thing you’re working on to a different layer, and then turn them on and off to show each in turn. Just remember to follow the rule about using groups and components only on separate layers (mentioned previously), and you’ll be fine.
</quote> As one who uses Layers in every model, I can't emphasize just how important it is to follow the above guide lines when working with layers.
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On 4/15/2014 5:26 PM, Swingman wrote:

Thanks.
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On 4/15/2014 9:22 AM, woodchucker wrote:

As has already been mentioned, you can use triple clicking to select all of the connected pieces of your panel. If the things that are around your panel are already components then they will not be selected when you triple click on the panel.
Dan
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If I understand the question, yes. In my understanding, basically it is the copies of groups that add significantly to the overhead. If you only need one brick in your model, making it either a group or component won't have an impact. But if you need a thousand, making it a component instead of a group will reduce the overhead. IME, the file size issue is less noticeable than the impact on performance.
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On 4/17/2014 7:49 AM, Swingman wrote:

I wonder what advantage there is to using groups rather than components other than having an additional number of named components in the drawing.
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On 4/17/2014 8:53 AM, Leon wrote:

I as a rule never make a "single part" into a group vs. a component. I do however often make a group of components into a group vs. a component.
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On 4/17/2014 8:55 AM, Leon wrote:

Nothing wrong with that ... AAMOF, that is exactly how "Dynamic Components" are made, with "nested" components.
IOW, a "DC" Base Cabinet is a component, comprised of sub components for the stiles, rails, end panels, etc.
This allows them to be re-sized programatically while maintaining certain dimensions, as well and axis positions.
IOW, the component "rail", inside Dynamic Component "Wall Cabinet" (a collection of its (nested) component parts) can be re-sized (SCALED) in length, without affecting it's width and thickness, as well as it's relation, in axis, to other component).
Try to "scale" with a "Group", which can't be programmed to be dynamic, and all the parts will change in dimension in proportion to the amount of "scale" imparted.
You may remember that one of the first things I did when I got the Pro version of SU was to immediately start programming "Dynamic Components" for kitchen base and wall cabinets so I could populate existing space for both new construction and remodeling without having to draw different sized cabinets.
While these initial dynamic components are still handy for my use, the sketchUp 3D model world is now full of these things, most sophisticated way beyond my programming abilities/time to mess with it.
You already know this, but for those paying attention to the thread looking for more information, the below will be helpful to save for their future use.
(Don't know where this came from/who to attribute to, but it is in my SketchUp EverNote file):
<quote> ~Groups:
A collection of faces and edges within a model that are isolated from other parts of the model.
Anything protected in a group cannot by affected by any geometry outside of that group.
To manipulate faces or edges within a group, or to add geometry to a group, that group must first be “activated” by double clicking on it.
If you draw a shape on something that is in a group, it won’t “stick” to the object unless you open the group first.
Groups can contain “loose geometry”, guides, section planes, dimensions, text, or other groups.
Groups can be manipulated as an assembly. (Move, rotate, scale, paint, copy, etc)
Groups have their own independent 3-axis from the rest of the model, and it can be reoriented
Copies of groups are independent from one another. Once a copy is made, any changes made to one instance of that group do NOT affect the other copies of that group.
~Components:
Similar to groups, except that each copy of a component remains identical to its original. Any changes made to an instance of a component are automatically reflected to each instance of that component.
Using Components for multiple copies of the same object within a model increases the performance of Sketchup when compared to using groups to do the same thing. That’s because Sketchup only has to define a component one time, whereas with groups, Sketchup has to define each and every group even if each group is technically identical.
Components can be saved independently from the current model and imported into other models. If you make any changes to the component, you can update the reference in any models you’ve imported it into.
You can assign a “gluing plane” to components. A gluing plane allows the component to automatically orient itself onto the face of the object you are moving it to. For example, if you had a component of a picture frame, you would want it to be placed flat on a wall. Depending upon which wall you place the component on, you would have to rotate the picture 90° and reposition it onto the wall. By defining a gluing plane, the component will automatically rotate as you move it so that it is oriented properly to whichever wall you are moving it to.
Components can be configured to “always face the camera”. When you first open Sketchup, you’ll notice how the person inside every default model always faces you, even as you orbit around the model. You can assign this property to components too.
If you want to make an instance of a component unique from its counterparts, you can right click it, and select “Make Unique”.
</quote>
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On 4/17/2014 9:58 AM, Swingman wrote:

Sorry, I misread that ... I read:
"group of components into a component"
not what you actually wrote:
"group of components into a group vs. a component."
Duh ... my bad.
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On 4/17/2014 8:53 AM, Leon wrote:

No, _copies_ of groups. ;)
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