Alchoholic problem

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Wow, I would never have considered that. Thanks for the tip.
There again is the time issue. Few people mention that, they always say how fast shellac dries. I have learned already that it is not too wise to work too fast, noticing the difference between a six to a 24 hour cure. Trust me, all this mention of time and patience is really appreciated here, I will be doing things differently.
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On 9/3/2015 7:31 PM, OFFW wrote:

Here's the contents of some old posts of mine on spraying shellac ... don't have time to find the responses, but you can DAGS if you need more:
1 1/2# cut of shellac is pretty standard for spraying shellac, IME.
Evaporation is obviously slower when the humidity is high due to the higher moisture content in the air.
So one method when spraying alcohol cut shellac in humid climates is to either allow evaporation to go faster by spraying on days with low humidity, or reduce the amount of water in the thinner (alcohol) itself ... mitigating, somewhat, the humidity induced slower evaporation as a factor.
An anhydrous alcohol has a low(er) water content. I usually use a 99% anhydrous isopropyl alcohol to cut shellac when spraying in this Gulf Coast climate on really humid days.
As I mentioned earlier, a possible problem spraying with thin alcohol cut shellac is the spray mist may dry before it actually hits the surface of the project ... particularly true with cheaper HVLP guns where you don't have a lot of tips available to fine tune the spray.
Shellac is about the only finish I use, and I always spray it.
If you are not planning on using anything but shellac, buy the three pound cut and thin it down to 1 1/2 with alcohol (I prefer to use this cut when spraying, but YMMV) ... experiment.
3 pound cut is what you get out of the can for the standard, although I've seen 4 and 5 pound cut at paint stores, and the "sanding sealer", out of the can should be a 2 pound cut.
You really don't need the dewaxed if shellac is all you're using ... the dewaxed being essential for compatibility with lacquer, poly and other top coat finishes added post shellac application.
The Zinnser sealer is dewaxed and works well when sprayed and can indeed be used as the finish coat.
I just generally use the regular BullsEye amber 3 pound cut, thinned to a 1 1/2 pound cut with 99% isopropyl alcohol (depending upon the temp/humidity) sprayed on for the final coat.
I find I have better application on extremely high humidity days with 99% isopropyl alcohol, but the Borg denatured works fine 99% of the time.
IME, with humidity, what you're worrying about is blush.
With 99% isopropyl alcohol you need to pay particular attention to the shellac drying before it hits the surface. If that is a problem, simply cut your material flow down a bit and spray closer to the work (with HVLP).
Spraying shellac is not that difficult, as a matter of fact, it is easy and forgiving with an off the shelf, $100 HVLP unit. A couple of minutes with a scrap piece to make sure material flow and distance is right, and spray on.
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Thank you for the detailed information, it is like a bright light in the middle of the night. Between what I have seen from me screwups and impatience, and all the info I have received here, I will be walking a different path with the shellac. Thanks all for the help, it sure is a long ways from the old days when I sprayed shellac on automotive wiring, for insulation and making it look good.
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Tst pst
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