Air Bubbles Part 2 :)

Hello,
A while back I posted a question regarding some air bubble issues that I had on my floors. To recap quickly: I sanded my floor and used a fast drying oil based Minwax polyurethane. About 40% of the floor dried up w/air bubbles. I know judging by the advice given with my 1st post that the problem was due to using the fast drying poly.
Now I wanted to ask what the best process would be to re-do this and do it right this time. What process am I looking at to 1st get rid of the bubbles, then after getting rid of them what am I looking at so I don't get the same results again. Will I have to re-sand all the way to bare wood again? Is using the lambs wool applicator a good idea?
Sorry for the 20 Q's. I appreciate any help you guys can provide.
--
Milwaukee, WI



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Sand just enough to get most of the outline of the bubble gone. Use the regular poly, and do not shake it. Use lamb wool applicator. Start at one side of room, working wall to wall, pouring the poly on the floor, and spreading quickly to keep a wet edge. Do not go back over an area after you put it down. You only get one shot.
Wear a respirator, and plan on sleeping somewhere else that night. Keep windows closed if you have no screens. This stuff is a bug magnet.
Good luck. -- Jim in NC
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Thanks for the great and fast advice. Some more questions however. Will I have to use a drum sander again to sand the bubbles out? what grit is the best for this? also the Minwax brand I used was a clear Gloss since it was oil based it gave the floor an auburn color. Will there be a color difference if I go with a different clear gloss poly? What poly is recommended for better results? Finally (I hope:) should I apply the poly w/the grain of the wood or does that not matter?
Again sorry for all these questions. I just need to be sure that I do this right this time. I don't have the time or money to keep repeating it :0).
Milwaukee, WI ---------------------------------
Sand just enough to get most of the outline of the bubble gone. Use the regular poly, and do not shake it. Use lamb wool applicator. Start at one side of room, working wall to wall, pouring the poly on the floor, and spreading quickly to keep a wet edge. Do not go back over an area after you put it down. You only get one shot.
Wear a respirator, and plan on sleeping somewhere else that night. Keep windows closed if you have no screens. This stuff is a bug magnet.
Good luck. -- Jim in NC
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I use the fast dry poly with a Duraseal label(same company) all the time for sealing floors. Bubbles in oil basre are often from applying too thick, sometimes when the wood is too hot in the sun. A mild case happened to me just last week. The lambswool really lays it on thick unless you work at spreading it out well. I've seen plenty of problems with lambswool even in the hands of journeymen finishers. Doesn't mean it can't be used, but...a good China bristle gives better control of the product. How much finish did you use for how many sq ft?
You will need to get the buffer and screen with a 120 grit. A used one is probably ok. You should see plenty of powder. Buff it good, vacuum, tack, and apply more coats. At least two at the recommended rates. Doesn't have to be thick. Keep windows closed for at least 4 hours, air flow is the enemy. I wouldn't use the Minwax poly. Fabulon Pro is the nicest oil imo.Satin is most commonly used, nice low lustre, show dust dirt glare the least. Semi-gloss sometimes. Depends on taste. Are you in Berlin?
M Hamlin The Oak Floors of Marco Los Gatos, CA

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