African Cherry


A lumberyard about 3 hours away from me is advertising African Cherry for $2/bf. From what I have read, it is a great wood except for a high silica content.
Has anyone used this wood, or even seen it? I am making a cabinet to go in room where everything else is teak. I was planning on cherry, but for the price, this seems too good to pass up. It it chews up a few router bits it is still cheap.
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Sounds to me like you're talking about makore.
Is this the stuff?
http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/makore.htm
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wrote:

I haven't seen it, but the stuff is called mubango.
They also have makore, both plain and figured, but it is rather more expensive; and I am not looking for really brittle wood. I have enough trouble with hickory.
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That's quite a collection of makore, some of the grain is amazing. When the statement is made "very brittle and subject to tear-out", does that imply a workability similar to luan? or is it better than that? The stuff looks pretty, but the idea of working with something that splinters just because you look at it cross-eyed wouldn't be much fun.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

It has been many years since I've used makore but I don't recall it being particularly hard to work. (I have no trouble at all with hickory either which someone else mentioned).
It is hard to compare anything to "lauan"/Phillipine mahogany as it is pretty much a generic term. There are at least four woods sold as same: one is light, soft and works well; another is also light, much harder and is terrible...splits, checks, splinters, tear out; still another is light-medium red/brown, fairly soft and works well; the last is medium-dark red/brown, harder and works well.
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When Googled African cherry consistently comes back with makore in brackets (makore). I'd always thought makore to be more mahogany like in color (colour David) but I suppose it's size of the pore that might be driving this naming.
During my very brief stint in the architectural stone business I was amazed how many stones had names given to them by a particular quarry or distributor even though they were nothing more than a stone of a name long recognized by the whole world (it was/is a marketing thing). It looks like we're into that here now with a lot of the "new to us" imports with names like African cherry.
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