advice on finishing needed

Hello, i am looking for advice from experienced woodworkers on which finish to use. I am looking for a clear finish (preferably gloss) which is 100% sealed from the air. Maybe i am expecting too much but if their is a one coat, titanium hard, 100% impenatrable barrier to the elements, lasts a long time and will kill any existing worms and infestation finish out their i would like to here where i can get it. Maybe someone can share grandads secret recipe with me?.......i once saw a carving from green mold infested wood covered in a thich transparent gloss finish which obviosly preserved the piece in that state. I am looking for something which will effectivly allow me to preserve a fresh piece of green burr wood (worms mold and all) in its present state without deteriorating further. I assumed the piece i saw in the shop was such a good sealer that the worms could not survive without oxygen nor any life form and that the piece would not continue to deteriorate under the finish. Forgive me if this is a dumb post and question...i am a total begginer in woodwork and am prone to being too optomistic in what is possible and what is not.
thanks in advance for any suggestions that do not include people laughing or sugesting i try plumbing instead of woodwork
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I don't know of any product that can give you what you want in one coat, but I recently have been using Kleer Kote, a 2 part epoxy. I bought it in gallon jugs (1 epoxy, 1 hardner) plus pumps that would push out equal, small amounts. see http://www.shopmaninc.com/pdf/kkote.pdf for more info. I don't recall who I bought it from except it was a company in Florida. It cost me about $45 delivered I think.
This is one product where you want to read the instructions thoroughly & do exactly what they say. The pdf I point to above is 3 pages & all you need to know, except that you really want it at least 70 degrees to use it. I coat bowls with it, generally after turning them green & drying them in a microwave. Thin coats! I buy those cheap plastic clear cups & mix it up in them, apply with a foam brush. Works great!
I'm not sure how well it works for exterior projects, but I did put 2 coats on the top of an old picnic table that sits on my open porch last summer. So far, so good. We've had temps down to about 10 degrees & other days up to 90, so far. It hasn't cracked yet, but it's been less than a year.
It doesn't really change the color of your project - but changes the contrast - kind of hard to explain. You know how polyurethane will soak in & make the contrasts in the grain more apparent? This does the same thing, but even more so. It REALLY soaks in. I've used it on rotted wood & it can take several light coats before it stops soaking in & builds up. I made a Willow bowl (very porous, close to rotting) which weighed nothing & now it weighs a pound.
I think this will do what you want, but I'm not sure that the soaking in of the product won't be a problem.
Jim
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thanks for that Jim, you've been a big help......from a quick look at the pdf, it looks like what i've been looking for
thanks again......A
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