advice on engraving process


Hi, Looking for some help on choosing a "paint" for a process to enhance the contrast of an engraving I am going to make on a slab of wood (say 12 inches by 18 inches). It is going to be a copy of a wedding invitation. Here is what I plan to do:
-surface the wood (my CNC is not flat enough (>0.01 inches) over this distance to skip this step), probably use a rustic slab of redwood or redwood burl -coat the wood with some type of "paint" -engrave the wood (typically 0.06 inches maximum depth for 0.5 inch tall letters, V groove cutter with variable depths) -stain or dye the engraved lettering so that it is darker than the surface -remove the "paint" -sand the surface
I am looking for a "paint" that will seal the surface, barely penetrate the wood and be easy to remove, preferably by sanding. I don't want to use a planer after engraving, it will damage the edges of the letters and additionally, the wood will not be flat after the surfacing step. I am guessing that a latex paint may work, it won't penetrate the wood too much and should be easy to remove although it will clog up sandpaper (no big deal). Maybe some kind of wax? Another idea is some kind of tape that will stay in place and not shift when I engrave through it? Another option is to not use stain and just rely on the contrast of the letters. I have done this so far with my half a dozen engraving attempts, but I think I want a little more contrast for this piece since it is all text and no illustrations. Another idea I have not tried yet is to make a lamination of a dark bottom layer and a light veneer (say 0.03 inches, close to my practical limit for large pieces) and then engrave through the light veneer. My first CNC is not flat enough to pull this off with a piece this large (I am planning for my second CNC to be much better). Thanks, Jaime
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Jaime...
You might find the discussion at <http://www.talkshopbot.com/messages/315/4716.html?1111624478 helpful. The topic there concerns CNC sign production, but the process is exactly what you're after.
BTW, I attached an MDF spoilboard to the bed of my CNC machine and then used the machine itself to flatten the spoilboard work surface. AFAICT, my work surface is *flat* over the entire 48x96 table. No reason the CNC can't work on itself...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Try sealing the wood first using wipe on poly or some other clear finish coat (or whatever) Then start your carving, then the painting process. Finally plane sand or whatever.
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
<snipped>

Shellac.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thanks for the responses, may try some shellac. The shopbot forums are also a great source of info as well. jaime
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.